How to Tie Fishing Line to a Spool

How to Tie Fishing Line to a Spool
The most common type of fishing line is monofilament, which is fairly easy to tie. The knot is a matter of choice, but an arbor knot is the most common because it's strong and simple to tie. The arbor knot consists of two overhand knots tied in succession so that when they are pulled tight they form the arbor knot.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fishing line Reel
  • Fishing line
  • Reel
Step 1
Wrap the fishing line around the arbor, or center, of the reel. Allow 3 to 4 inches of the line to extend past the spool to allow for a knot.
Step 2
Tie an overhand knot with the tag, or loose end, of the line by wrapping it around the main line. Do this by forming a loop with the line and passing the tag end through it. Make sure the loop is formed around the main line.
Step 3
Tie a second overhand knot using only the tag end of the line. This knot will not pass around the main line.
Step 4
Slowly pull the knots around the arbor of the reel. Pull tight to make sure the knots do not come loose. Monofilament lines, especially those of larger diameters, may tend to loosen until the knot is securely tightened.
Step 5
Pull the knot tight to secure the line around the spool. As the line is pulled tight, the knot on the tag of the line will pull against the first overhand knot around the main line and tighten. Trim any excess line from beyond the second knot.

Tips & Warnings

 
For spinning reels, make sure the bail wire is open so that, after the line is secured to the spool, the bail can be closed and the line wound onto the spool. Practice tying the knot with larger cord or string to better understand how it works.
 
For spinning reels, make sure the bail wire is open so that, after the line is secured to the spool, the bail can be closed and the line wound onto the spool.
 
Practice tying the knot with larger cord or string to better understand how it works.
 
When handling monofilament line, keep in mind that tightly stretched line can cut.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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