How to Rig a Plastic Worm

How to Rig a Plastic Worm
Plastic worms often are used to catch bass, but rigging them so they don't get snagged when fished in heavy weeds and vegetation is tricky. This problem can be overcome by Texas rigging the worm, a method that allows the angler to cast into all kinds of places where bass lurk without having to constantly free the plastic worm from being stuck.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Rod and reel Worm weight Offset worm hook Plastic worm
  • Rod and reel
  • Worm weight
  • Offset worm hook
  • Plastic worm
 
Step 1
Lace a bullet-shaped worm weight onto your line with the cone-like end facing away from the end of the line. These weights allow the worm to drop down into the water, and their shape lets you pull them through heavy cover more easily.
Step 2
Tie your offset worm hook to the end of the line using a clinch knot. Be careful not to let the bullet weight slip off as you do this.
Step 3
Take your plastic worm by its thickest end and pass the sharp end of the hook through the very end of it.
Step 4
Bring the point of the hook out of the worm after stringing it through only 1/2 inch, poking the hook out through and then turning it so that the point is facing the plastic worm. Pull the worm up onto the shaft of the hook so the end is near the hook's eye. Your worm should be dangling straight down from the hook.
Step 5
Jam the point of the hook into the dangling worm at that spot directly opposite from the point. Push in the hook until it almost pops out the other side, but don't bring it all the way through. This completes the Texas rigging process. The rig will make it through weeds without snagging, and any fish that bites the worm will cause the hook to come out the other side of the lure and into its jaw.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
You can keep the worm weight from moving by simply poking a toothpick through its center, breaking it off so that it keeps the weight in place.

Don't Miss a Thing!

All our latest outdoor content delivered to your inbox once a week.

FREE UPDATES

Subscribe

We promise to keep your email address safe and secure.