How to Renew Passports for Children in Canada

How to Renew Passports for Children in Canada
While the policy is still only a recommendation, the Canadian government strongly urges all of its citizens to get passports--especially children. This is an attempt to fight the increase in child slavery and exploitation worldwide. Obtaining a passport for a Canadian child is relatively simple. Renewal is also straightforward, but a child passport must be renewed more often than an adult one to ensure the photo is up to date. A parent or legal guardian must be involved in the process for anyone under the age of 16.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Passport photo Expired or damaged passport Original proof of Canadian citizenship Custody information (if adopted) Passport application form
  • Passport photo
  • Expired or damaged passport
  • Original proof of Canadian citizenship
  • Custody information (if adopted)
  • Passport application form
Step 1
Collect all the information in the Things You'll Need section. Make sure the photo of the child is recent--taken within one month of the application. Make a copy of the old passport for your records. Make sure the proof of citizenship (birth certificate or certificate of citizenship) is the original certificate, not a copy.
Step 2
Obtain a blank copy of the Canadian child passport form (see Resources). Fill out the entire application. You must include the child's full legal name, place of birth and projected dates of travel.
Step 3
Take the passport application to any passport-granting office (see Resources) with the child and, preferably, both parents. You can also send in the application to the granting office in Quebec with the original proof of citizenship, old passport and payment. (As of 2010, the rates were 37 Canadian dollars for a child older than 3 years and CA$22 for a child younger than 3.)
Step 4
Contact the passport office (see Resources) to find out how long the processing time is. You should allot at least six weeks to receive the passport by mail--especially if you have a trip planned.

Article Written By Duncan Jenkins

Based in Eugene, Ore., Duncan Jenkins has been writing finance-related articles since 2008. His specialties include personal finance advice, mortgage/equity loans and credit management. Jenkins obtained his bachelor's degree in English from Clark University.

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