How to Explore the North Pole

How to Explore the North Pole
Unlike the South Pole, which sits on the continent of Antarctica, the North Pole lies in the middle of the Arctic Ocean among constantly shifting ice sheets. This makes exploring the region arduous. The North terrestrial pole is often confused with the magnetic north pole. However, these two points are in different locations. Any trek or exploration of the North Pole should be performed in a group, or on an expedition with experienced Arctic travelers. Since the polar ice is constantly shifting, experienced guides and a large amount of gear is necessary to even get close to the terrestrial North Pole.

Instructions

Difficulty: Challenging

Step 1
Contact a guide service or expedition to arrange travel, and exploration of the North pole. Many of these services are available on the Internet such as IceTrek.com Expeditions, or at local outfitters in the northernmost regions of Canada. The expedition services are very expensive, but they provide you with all the necessary gear and equipment to survive the harsh environment, and they can get you there and back safely.
Step 2
Join an expedition that allows you to travel to different areas around the North pole, such as the closest land mass--Kaffeklubben Island, off the coast of Greenland--or near the drifting Russian pole stations. Many of these guides will allow you to explore the safer regions of the polar area, through guided trekking only. This is for your safety so do not be discouraged.
Step 3
Choose an adventurer's expedition, such as a ski expedition, that allows you to travel larger regions of the North Pole in a group. These trips can be as long as a week, but typically last about three days, with a day of skiing the polar ice, and a night of camping at the top of the world. You will also have time to explore limited areas on your own, take photographs, or stay inside the tent station if you can't take the cold.

Tips & Warnings

 
Do not attempt to explore the North Pole alone, especially if you have little experience in an Arctic environment. All Arctic expeditions are considered high risk, and extreme caution and preparedness is essential to surviving in the harsh climate.
 
Do not attempt to explore the North Pole alone, especially if you have little experience in an Arctic environment.
 
All Arctic expeditions are considered high risk, and extreme caution and preparedness is essential to surviving in the harsh climate.

Article Written By Jeremiah Blanchard

Jeremiah Blanchard has been writing professionally since 2006, specializing in topics related to nature, the environment, conservation and philosophy. His work has appeared in activist columns on Socyberty and Authspot. Blanchard studied art at William Carey College and history at the University of Southern Mississippi.

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