How to Sell Old Aluminum Scuba Tanks

How to Sell Old Aluminum Scuba Tanks
Scuba diving is a recreational sport enjoyed by many. Although many divers own their gear, there are always some who need equipment. With so many items needed to scuba dive, an interested buyer will first look for a scuba tank. Aluminum tanks are the "norm" for divers, since they are lighter than their steel counterparts. Although you can sell your tank anywhere, the best chance for getting top dollar for your tank will be online. With some quick checks on your tank, you can get your old gear sold quickly and easily, by yourself.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Aluminum scuba tank Certified scuba shop
  • Aluminum scuba tank
  • Certified scuba shop
Step 1
Have your aluminum scuba tank both visually inspected and hydro tested at your local dive shop. This will cost around $40, but it is a vital part of selling your tank. The dates will be stamped onto the top of your tank; mention these dates when selling it.
Step 2
If your scuba tank has a DIN valve attached to it, you will want to get that replaced with a newer, lighter K valve. Many older tanks still use the DIN valves, and these are now obsolete.
Step 3
List your scuba tank for sale on Craigslist or eBay. Unfortunately, online stores do not participate in trades, so the only way to sell your tank is through private resale.
Step 4
Once you sell the tank, remove any remaining air and ship it to the buyer. This will prevent the tank from exploding from careless handling.

Tips & Warnings

 
If you don't want to worry about the hassles of shipping, try selling your scuba tank locally. This will be easier, but you might not get as much money as you were hoping for.
 
If you don't want to worry about the hassles of shipping, try selling your scuba tank locally. This will be easier, but you might not get as much money as you were hoping for.
 
Never try to visually inspect your own scuba tank. The tank could still have some pressure inside, and it could pop the valve off, resulting in injury to you or others.
 
Never try to visually inspect your own scuba tank. The tank could still have some pressure inside, and it could pop the valve off, resulting in injury to you or others.

Article Written By Sam Surgalski

Sam Surgalski is a writer in Traverse City, Mich. His articles have appeared in The iPhone App Review, Winners Within Us, and on various other websites. Surgalski has a passion for all things aviation and writing, and enjoys playing the piano.

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