How to Make Home Bait for Catfish

How to Make Home Bait for Catfish
When it comes to catching catfish, there are two approaches to preparing bait. One is to use fish, seafood or some other basic fish bait. The other approach capitalizes on the fact that catfish are bottom feeders and like fragrant, decaying food. Both approaches have their supporters, and there is no guarantee that catfish in two different areas are going to like exactly the same type of food.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Fish Bait

Things You’ll Need:
  • Worm
  • Crawdads
  • Shrimp
  • Minnows
  • Mackerel
  • Anchovy
  • Knife
  • Chicken livers
  • Chicken blood
  • Assorted raw fish
  • Sausages
  • Limburger cheese
  • Bar soap
  • Blender
  • Bowl
  • Flour
  • Spoon
Step 1
Get a fish or other small aquatic animal or a worm. Crawdads, shrimp, minnows and cut bait such as mackerel and anchovy all work well.
Step 2
Kill the animal if it is alive. Bass will often eat a live minnow, preventing you from hooking a catfish. Because catfish have no aversion to dead and decaying animals, killing your bait first will help you filter out fish that might.
Step 3
Prepare the bait. Peel each shrimp, and cut it in half. Divide cut bait into chunks about 1 inch square. If you are using crawdads, remove the meat from the tail, and use it to fish.

Stink Bait

Step 1
Save strong-smelling parts of meat. Catfish love chicken livers and blood, raw fish of pretty much any sort, sausages and shrimp. Tightly store scraps and skins or inexpensive fillets in a corner of your refrigerator where they won't touch anything.
Step 2
Open the windows. Place the animal products in a blender when they start to smell. Add some smelly cheese such as Limburger and unscented bar soap. Liquefy the mixture.
Step 3
Pour the blended gunk into a bowl. Stir in flour until it takes on a doughy consistency. You now have stink bait.
Step 4
Store the mixture in a sealed food storage bag inside a food storage container until you are ready to use it. This will minimize the degree to which the smell permeates your refrigerator.

Article Written By Isaiah David

Isaiah David is a freelance writer and musician living in Portland, Ore. He has over five years experience as a professional writer and has been published on various online outlets. He holds a degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.

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