How to Attach a Fishing Jig to a Line

How to Attach a Fishing Jig to a Line
Jig fishing is a great way to attract fish and entice them to strike. Jigs typically consist of a hook that has a molded piece of lead attached just below the eye. The lead may be round, elongated or football in shape to provide different actions. Soft plastic baits, skirts made of rubber or hair and spinner blades are often attached along the shank of the hook to provide different looks and fishing actions. Jigs are bounced up and down through the water, along the bottom and over structure to entice a variety of game fish. They're easy to attach to your fishing line.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Step 1
Hold the free, or tag end, of the fishing line in one hand and the jig in the other. Position the jig so that the eye of the jig is easily accessible for tying.
Step 2
Attach the jig to the line, using an improved clinch knot. Pass the tag end of the line through the eye of the jig. Pull the line through the eye so that 4 to 5 inches of line extend through.
Step 3
Wrap the tag end around the main line. Begin near the eye of the jig and begin making concentric turns around the main line. Make six to seven turns around the main line.
Step 4
Turn the tag end down and pass it through the small loop formed just above the eye of the jig. Do not pull the knot tight at this point.
Step 5
Locate the loop formed along the side of the knot that was made by turning the line down to the small loop. Pass the tag end of the line through the elongated loop. Moisten the knot and pull down tightly. Use a pair of snips to cut any excess from the tag end of the knot.

Tips & Warnings

 
Use the improved clinch knot for a variety of both fresh and saltwater hook and lure applications.

Article Written By Keith Dooley

Keith Dooley has a degree in outdoor education and sports management. He has worked as an assistant athletic director, head coach and assistant coach in various sports including football, softball and golf. Dooley has worked for various websites in the past, contributing instructional articles on a wide variety of topics.

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