How to Rig Cut Bait for Fishing

How to Rig Cut Bait for FishingCut bait is a popular choice to lure fish, depending on what you're fishing for. All fish species have different preferences, but some, such as catfish and northern pike, love to go after cut-up pieces of fish. Popular choices for cut bait include shad and squid, but any kind of meat that gives off a pungent scent and attracts fish will do. The key to using cut bait is putting it onto the hook properly so that it will hold to the hook and entice a fish to unknowingly bite down.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Step 1
Cut your live bait into thin, worm-like strips or into small chunks to put onto the hook. When you cut the meat, try to leave some skin on each piece of cut bait. The skin will be the strongest thing to penetrate and hold your bait to your hook.
Step 2
Pierce a chunk of cut bait through the center of the piece, including through the skin, if possible.
Step 3
Stab the hook about 1/2 inch from the end of the strip of cut bait, piercing the skin as close to the center of the strip as possible.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Thin strips are most commonly used for trolling, while cubes are popular for all other methods of fishing.
 
Don't make your strips too long--2 to 3 inches is plenty. The more excess cut bait hanging off past the hook, the more likely it is that a fish will snatch part of the cut bait without biting the hook.
 
Chicken livers aren't classified as cut bait, but they are used in the same scenario as cut bait, can be cut and hooked the same way, and are highly successful with some fish, particularly catfish.
 
Always supervise children working with knives and/or hooks.

Article Written By Jonathan Croswell

Jonathan Croswell has spent more than five years writing and editing for a number of newspapers and online publications, including the "Omaha World-Herald" and "New York Newsday." Croswell received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Nebraska and is currently pursuing a Master's of Health and Exercise Science at Portland State University.

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