How to Defog a Snorkeling Mask

How to Defog a Snorkeling Mask
One of the persistent problems with snorkel masks is fogging. Even in tropical waters, the temperature difference between the air pocket in the mask and the surrounding water will inevitably cause a little fogging. There are some time-tested and true methods for dealing with this problem.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Preliminary Procedure

Step 1
Clean a new mask thoroughly with soap and water before taking it out for snorkeling. New masks often have packing oils on them, and these cause severe fogging.
Step 2
Rinse out the mask with water upon arrival at where you intend to snorkel.
Step 3
Spit inside the mask and rub it around the surface of the lenses.

During Snorkeling

Step 1
Continue looking down into the water, and place one or both hands on the top of the mask.
Step 2
Tilt the mask down so the top opens, and it will fill the mask with water.
Step 3
Bring your head and face to the surface, place your hands on the bottom of the mask, and tilt the mask forward to open the bottom. This will flush the water out of the mask.

Tips & Warnings

 
Sometimes on a long snorkeling trip, the preliminary defogging steps are not good enough to make it for the duration. It then becomes necessary to defog while in the water, and it is not always convenient to take the mask off and repeat the preliminary procedure. It therefore becomes necessary to use the second method. Some snorkelers like to use defogging gel instead of saliva. The gel works very well so long as it is still in the mask, but in a wet environment, it gets washed out easily.
 
Sometimes on a long snorkeling trip, the preliminary defogging steps are not good enough to make it for the duration. It then becomes necessary to defog while in the water, and it is not always convenient to take the mask off and repeat the preliminary procedure. It therefore becomes necessary to use the second method.
 
Some snorkelers like to use defogging gel instead of saliva. The gel works very well so long as it is still in the mask, but in a wet environment, it gets washed out easily.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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