How to Clean Dried Fish Blood Off of a Fishing Boat

How to Clean Dried Fish Blood Off of a Fishing Boat
If you are using your boat to fish, there will come a time when fish blood will get on the boat. If this happens, it's best to deal with the blood as soon as possible by trying to wash it off. When the blood is fresh, a little swab of water is usually all it takes to remove it. But if it's allowed to dry, it will take a little more effort to remove. Be as green as possible when cleaning your boat to protect the environment.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Tips on Cleaning Dried Fish Blood on a Boat

Things You’ll Need:
  • Water 35% Hydrogen Peroxide Powdered Hydrogen Peroxide Scrubbing Brush
  • Water
  • 35% Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Powdered Hydrogen Peroxide
  • Scrubbing Brush
Step 1
Remove your boat from the water before cleaning it. Clean your boat on land so the chemicals won't harm the environment.
Step 2
Rinse the dried blood with water. Allow the water to sit on the area for about 15 minutes to loosen the blood.
Step 3
Cover the area of dried blood with 35 percent hydrogen peroxide, and let it sit for 20 minutes.
Step 4
Scrub the area. If the blood hasn't dissolved, repeat the above step and scrub again. Rinse the area with water once the blood is gone.
Step 5
Apply powdered hydrogen peroxide to the area of dried blood. Make a thick paste with water.
Step 6
Scrub the paste into the area of dried blood, and allow it sit for about 20 minutes. Rinse with water. Repeat if the blood hasn't dissolved.

Tips & Warnings

 
The 35 percent hydrogen peroxide can be purchased at a health food store. Powdered peroxide can usually be found on the laundry aisle at your local grocery store. It's a non-bleach clothing whitener, and the package is usually marked "safe for colored clothes." Never put chemicals into waterways by cleaning your boat in the water.
 
The 35 percent hydrogen peroxide can be purchased at a health food store.
 
Powdered peroxide can usually be found on the laundry aisle at your local grocery store. It's a non-bleach clothing whitener, and the package is usually marked "safe for colored clothes."
 
Never put chemicals into waterways by cleaning your boat in the water.

Article Written By Joyce Starr

Joyce Starr is a professional writer from Florida and owns a landscaping company and garden center. She has published articles about camping in Florida, lawn care and gardening and writes for a local gardening newsletter. She shares her love and knowledge of the outdoors and nature through her writing.

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