How to Put Together Diving Equipment

How to Put Together Diving Equipment
Scuba diving allows for up-close viewing of the aquatic world, and is an experience that many treasure. Scuba diving, however, requires that participants follow proper safety procedures and protocol to avoid possible injury. This protocol calls for proper assembly of scuba gear, and correctly putting your scuba gear together is a critical safety precaution for scuba divers at any level.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Scuba mask Snorkel Fins Wetsuit Scuba tank BCD (Buoyancy control device) Depth gauge Compass Regulator Alternative air source Submersion pressure gauge Weight belt
  • Scuba mask
  • Snorkel
  • Fins
  • Wetsuit
  • Scuba tank
  • BCD (Buoyancy control device)
  • Depth gauge
  • Compass
  • Regulator
  • Alternative air source
  • Submersion pressure gauge
  • Weight belt
Step 1
Wet the BCD (buoyancy control device) in the ocean or freshwater place where you will be scuba diving, and slide it onto the tank, starting from the top. Make sure the tank is straight. If you do not wet the BCD before putting it on the tank, it could slide off in the water. Check to see that the valve opening faces toward the BCD and the back of your head. Secure and tighten the BCD to the tank, making sure it is not loose. Swing the locking mechanism from the left side of the tank to the right, asking for help if needed. Double-check the unit by shaking it to ensure nothing is loose.
Step 2
Take off the plastic cap over the tank valve opening. Inspect and clean the O-ring. Do not dive if the O-ring is missing. Unscrew the yoke screw and remove the dust cap. Place the tank/BCD unit in front of you and align the tank and first stage opening. When properly aligned, tighten it. The regulator hose should be on your right. Attach the low-pressure hose found on the regulator to the BCD inflator.
Step 3
Take the submersion pressure gauge and hold it facing away from you. Open the valve slowly, and if you hear a leak, check the O-ring, which may be damaged or dirty. Watch the pressure gauge as the valve is turned to ensure it is operating properly. Continue turning the valve slowly until it stops, and then turn it a half-turn forward. Press the purge valve a few times and attempt to breathe through the regulator. If you cannot breathe easily or the tank is not full, do not dive.
Step 4
Place the unit on the ground and prepare the rest of the diving equipment. Make sure that the BCD is facing up, and that the second stage is on top of the BCD and not in the dirt.
Step 5
Put your wetsuit on. The zipper will be in the back, and the suit should feel tight. Wetsuits allow divers to withstand the colder temperatures in the lower depths of the ocean.
Step 6
Put on the weight belt and adjust it accordingly, by holding the buckle in your left hand and the other end in your right hand. If you have never dove before, ask an instructor or experienced diver how much weight you should distribute around the belt. Make sure that in the event of an emergency you could easily remove the belt.
Step 7
Put the tank/BCD unit on by having someone hold the unit and slip it on like a jacket. Adjust the straps and make sure all hoses are not tangled. Put on the mask, snorkel and fins. Ensure that you can see out of the mask. Try putting on the fins in the water if you are having difficulty.

Tips & Warnings

 
If you are a new or beginner diver, always dive with either an instructor or an experienced diver in your group. An experienced diver or instructor will double-check your equipment and make sure everything is in order, and will also know how to help you in an emergency.
 
If you are a new or beginner diver, always dive with either an instructor or an experienced diver in your group. An experienced diver or instructor will double-check your equipment and make sure everything is in order, and will also know how to help you in an emergency.

Article Written By James Wiley

James Wiley graduated from Providence College in 2009 as a double major in global studies and Spanish. Wiley's capstone thesis paper was published in the Providence College database. He has also competed in international script-writing competitions and coauthored a pilot which placed in the top 15 percent of international entries over the past year.

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