How to Make Energy Bars

How to Make Energy Bars
Energy bars boost your flagging get-up-and-go, but at more than a dollar apiece, eating one is like biting into your grocery budget. There is a delicious way to cut the cost of energy bars while adding a huge variety of flavors. A homemade energy bar need never be the same once you make your first batch. Even those who rarely or never bake can succeed at making delicious energy bars at home. Those with food allergies will trade time spent reading commercial labels for time in the kitchen time and will be assured of safe eating.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • 4 cups rolled oats 1 cup flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup brown sugar 2/3 cup butter 2/3 cup honey 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 to 3 eggs, optional 1/2 cup chocolate chips 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1/2 cup chopped nuts 9" x 13" pan, greased Electric mixer (optional) Large mixing bowl Small pan Rubber spatula or wooden spoon Plastic wrap Sandwich-size zip-seal plastic bags
  • 4 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 2/3 cup butter
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 to 3 eggs, optional
  • 1/2 cup chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts
  • 9" x 13" pan, greased
  • Electric mixer (optional)
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Small pan
  • Rubber spatula or wooden spoon
  • Plastic wrap
  • Sandwich-size zip-seal plastic bags
Step 1
Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit and gather your equipment and ingredients.
Step 2
Melt the butter and honey together in a pan.
Step 3
Combine the oats, flour, baking soda, salt and brown sugar in a mixing bowl.
Step 4
Make a well in the center of the oat mixture and pour in the butter-honey mixture and vanilla. If using eggs, they should be added at this step (eggs are not necessary but will raise the protein level of your energy bars). Use an electric mixer on low speed or your own strong arm to make a stiff batter.
Step 5
Fold in the other ingredients and press the mixture into a greased 9" x 13" pan. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes at 325 degrees Fahrenheit.
Step 6
Cut into into 48 bars while still hot, then allow the bars to cool completely before removing them from the pan.
Step 7
Wrap a one- or two-bar serving in plastic wrap, then put each serving into zip-seal baggies, label and freeze until needed. Those with food-sealing systems may shrink-wrap and store bars in a cool, dark, dry place.

Tips & Warnings

 
Get ingredients from the bulk section of your supermarket, a food cooperative or online. Those who don't like preservatives can use organic ingredients. Substitute freely: any rolled grain or combination of grain flakes for oats; coconut or palm oil for butter; agave or maple syrup for honey. Try any dried fruit or nut and don't forget flaked, unsweetened coconut. Add "sweet" spices like cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and allspice. Gluten-free eaters can use gluten-free oats and baking mix.
 
Get ingredients from the bulk section of your supermarket, a food cooperative or online.
 
Those who don't like preservatives can use organic ingredients.
 
Substitute freely: any rolled grain or combination of grain flakes for oats; coconut or palm oil for butter; agave or maple syrup for honey. Try any dried fruit or nut and don't forget flaked, unsweetened coconut.
 
Add "sweet" spices like cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and allspice.
 
Gluten-free eaters can use gluten-free oats and baking mix.
 
Energy bars are not meal replacements. They are convenient boosts to one's metabolism when engaged in endurance sports and, as such, a supplement to a healthy and balanced diet. Avoid reduced-calorie ingredients; they defeat the purpose of an energy bar. Understand your pantry climate and freeze bars if there is a chance they will spoil at room temperature.
 
Energy bars are not meal replacements. They are convenient boosts to one's metabolism when engaged in endurance sports and, as such, a supplement to a healthy and balanced diet.
 
Avoid reduced-calorie ingredients; they defeat the purpose of an energy bar.
 
Understand your pantry climate and freeze bars if there is a chance they will spoil at room temperature.

Article Written By Lani Johnson

Lani Johnson is a hiking, writing musician. Recent published work includes journalism, poetry and research. See her online writing at Trails.com or at Azacda.presspublisher.us.

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