How to Attach a Water Ski Rope to the Boat

How to Attach a Water Ski Rope to the Boat
When your vacation's recreational activities include water skiing, you may already have your skis, but not a boat. If the boat you rent isn't equipped with a ski pylon, never fear: you can still attach your tow rope straight to the boat. The boat can't turn as tightly sometimes, and that larger turn means taking extra precautions when operating close to the shore. But an attentive captain and the right knot will keep your water skiing activities from capsizing.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Step 1
Take the rope in your right hand, one foot from the end of the rope (the bitter end). Use your left hand to make a small loop in the rope, right next to your right hand.
Step 2
Hold the loop with your right hand and with your left hand, thread the bitter end through the tow ring on the stern (back) of the boat.
Step 3
Bring the bitter end through the loop in the rope--the one you're holding with your right hand--with your left hand, and pass the bitter end around the back of the rope in your right hand.
Step 4
Push the rope through the loop that you're holding once more and pull six extra inches of the rope through the loop. Move your right hand back along the rope (away from the loop) and pull the rope with your right hand and pull the bitter end with your left hand. This will draw the small loop (the one you were holding) closed around the other end of the rope to form a knot that holds a loop that feeds through the towing loop in the boat.

Tips & Warnings

 
The bowline (this knot) is useful for creating a loop at the end of a rope whenever you happen to need one.
 
The bowline (this knot) is useful for creating a loop at the end of a rope whenever you happen to need one.

Article Written By Will Charpentier

Will Charpentier is a writer who specializes in boating and maritime subjects. A retired ship captain, Charpentier holds a doctorate in applied ocean science and engineering. He is also a certified marine technician and the author of a popular text on writing local history.

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