How To Fix Bike Seat Pillars

How To Fix Bike Seat Pillars
A pillar, or seat post, is the adjustable length of tube that attaches the saddle to the bike frame. Being adjustable, the seat post allows the cyclist to customize both the height and fore-aft position of his saddle. You can fix or adjust a seat post in two areas: the point where the seat post enters the bike frame and the point where it attaches to the saddle.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Seat post binder

Things You’ll Need:
  • 5 mm hex key
 
Step 1
Locate the binder that that secures the seat post to the frame. There will be either a hex bolt or flip lock that tightens the binder.
Step 2
Loosen the hex bolt or open the flip lock, depending on the design.
Step 3
Raise or lower the seat post as needed. If the post is stuck and bonded to the surface of the seat tube, parktool.com recommends using a mild acid to weaken the bond, such as lemon juice or soda pop. Allow some time for the acid to work before attempting to twist the seat post free.
Step 4
Tighten the binder bolt or close the flip lock, once you have raised the seat post to the ideal height. Ensure that the tip of the saddle is in line with the top tube of your frame, so the saddle is not crooked. Readjust if necessary.

Seat post saddle clamp

Step 1
Locate the bolt or bolts on the underside of where the saddle rails attach to the seat post. These bolts hold a clamp in place, which secures the saddle to the seat post.
Step 2
Loosen the bolts. Unless replacing the saddle or adding fresh grease to the bolt threads, it isn't necessary to fully remove the bolts.
Step 3
Fix the fore/aft position of your saddle as needed. Repositioning the seat post clamp can also allow you to tilt your saddle forward or back. Some cyclist prefer a degree of tilt.
Step 4
Re-tighten the clamp bolts.
 

Article Written By Matthew Ferguson

Matthew Ferguson is a writer living in Savannah, Ga. He has been writing for over 10 years and his work has appeared on various online publications. A collection of his short stories was published in spring 2010. He is a graduate of Appalachian State University.

Don't Miss a Thing!

All our latest outdoor content delivered to your inbox once a week.

FREE UPDATES

Subscribe

We promise to keep your email address safe and secure.