How to Train on Water Skis

How to Train on Water Skis
Learning how to ski, like most skills, takes time, patience and a bit of technique. Balance is crucial and previous athletic ability in a related discipline like snow skiing or snow boarding can help substantially. Yet, whether you're a seasoned athlete or just want to try something new for the first time, water skiing can be taught to almost anyone. There are many ways to train for this skill, so when investigating how to best enter this sport pay attention to the method and style that best fits you. For this introduction, you will learn how to get up by yourself and stay upright--a milestone for all newbies.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Getting into Position

Things You’ll Need:
  • Water skis with bindings Towrope Motor boat Wet suit or bathing suit
  • Water skis with bindings
  • Towrope
  • Motor boat
  • Wet suit or bathing suit
Step 1
Enter the water with your skis and rope handle. After entering the water lean back so you can place the water skis snugly against your feet; it should be a tight fit but not constricting.
Step 2
Place the tow rope handle between your knees. Afterward make sure your knees are bent towards your chest.
Step 3
Aim the front tips of the skis toward the rear of the boat, keeping their distance about shoulder length apart. Leave 6 to 12 inches of your ski tip above the water surface.
Step 4
Call out to the boat driver to gradually begin towing. Once the boat moves forward keep the knees together and your skis parallel. At the same time your arms should be straight out and slightly bent at the elbows. Keep your chin pointed toward your chest.
Step 5
Push forward slightly with both feet as the speed begins to increase, but remain in your seated position until the boat tows your body upward on top of the water.

Taking a Stand

Step 1
Slowly elevate yourself to a standing position remembering again to keep your skis horizontal to the water and parallel to each other. Once in a standing position keep your knees bent for shock absorption. The term for this stance is called "planning."
Step 2
Continue to balance yourself on the skis with your head towards the boat. Your vision should be face forward anticipating where you are headed (about 15 feet or more in front of you).
Step 3
Keep inside the boat wake until you get comfortable enough to venture outside.

Tips & Warnings

 
A good idea is to use hand signals to communicate to the boat driver if you want to go fast slower or stop. You can also work out hand signals so that the driver will pull you right or left. If you find your legs feel as though they are battling hard against the current you may be fighting too much. The idea is work with the water, not against it. Relax and keep your body loose.
 
A good idea is to use hand signals to communicate to the boat driver if you want to go fast slower or stop. You can also work out hand signals so that the driver will pull you right or left.
 
If you find your legs feel as though they are battling hard against the current you may be fighting too much. The idea is work with the water, not against it. Relax and keep your body loose.
 
Make sure to let go of the rope when you fall otherwise you'll be dragged along face first into wakes--no fun. Make sure you know the water area or are with someone who knows the area your skiing in. Obstacles such as rocks, trees and other debris can hide beneath the water's surface and can cause serious danger.
 
Make sure to let go of the rope when you fall otherwise you'll be dragged along face first into wakes--no fun.
 
Make sure you know the water area or are with someone who knows the area your skiing in. Obstacles such as rocks, trees and other debris can hide beneath the water's surface and can cause serious danger.

Article Written By Jason Shueh

Jason Shueh is a northern California native who has a passion for writing dynamic stories. As a journalist he's interviewed mountain bike Olympic hopefuls headed for Beijing, covered the 2009 Amgen Tour of California cycling event and is currently doing freelance work to start up an online fitness column for Diablo Magazine.

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