How to Inspect SCUBA Tanks

How to Inspect SCUBA Tanks
A SCUBA tank is a lifeline when going for a dive. Therefore, you will need to make sure your tank passes the test before you head out to search the waterways. There are both external and internal tests to perform. You will need to examine the tank for visible signs of corrosion. You will also need to perform a hydrostatic pressure test every five years to check how well the tank holds up under pressure. Both steel and aluminum tanks should not show signs of corrosion, especially around the valve threads.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • Scuba cylinder Caliper with depth measurement capability in thousandths of an inch Straightedge Ruler or tape measure
  • Scuba cylinder
  • Caliper with depth measurement capability in thousandths of an inch
  • Straightedge
  • Ruler or tape measure
Step 1
Discard any tank with fire damage. If you see any signs of charring, scorching, or melting, you should not use the tank. For tanks with new paint jobs, check to make sure the paint isn't covering up prior damage.
Step 2
Examine for dents or bulges. You can do this by using a straightedge to determine the presence of any raised or depressed areas. If there is a bulge, your straightedge should wobble over the edges. If you find a cylinder with dents deeper than sixty thousandths of an inch or any bulges, you should discard the tank.
Step 3
Look for cuts, deep scratches, or gouges. If you find a tank with any of these flaws more than six inches long, or deeper than thirty thousandths of an inch, you should discard the tank.
Step 4
Check for surface corrosion. If you find one with corrosion over sixty thousandths of an inch deep, or with widespread corrosion over thirty thousandths of an inch deep, you should discard the tank. Tanks that have corrosion over six inches long should be discarded. If more than one-quarter of the tank is covered with corrosion of any depth, you should condemn it.
Step 5
Allow a professional to run an internal inspection. Should the tank pass the external inspection in Steps 1 through 4, or the hydrostatic pressure test sticker has expired or been repainted, take it to a professional.

Article Written By Krista Raye

Krista Raye is a Steel Magnolia who began writing professionally in 2009 with eHow, Answerbag and Trails. She has 10 years teaching experience in middle and high schools. Raye holds a Bachelor of Arts in English, a Bachelor of Science in secondary English education and a Master of Arts in adolescent English education.

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