How to Build a Snow Ramp

How to Build a Snow Ramp
The best snow ramps are found at ski resorts, but with a little effort you can build your own ramp. Tailor it for your purpose and build it with safety in mind. A steep ramp will let you catch more air, but it also requires a steep hill to build speed ahead of the ramp. A low incline is fun for sledding, snow boarding and skiing. It limits your hang time and the type of tricks you can do, however. Make sure there's a soft landing pad behind the ramp to prevent injuries.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

The Ramp

Things You’ll Need:
  • Round metal garbage can
  • 3/8 inch x 4 foot x 8 foot plywood
  • Sheet metal screws
  • Snow shovel
  • Snow
  • Drill and bit
Step 1
Sink a round metal garbage can into the snow at the desired height. Weight the can by putting rocks inside. On the ramp side of the can, use a shovel and your hands to pack snow at a moderate incline.
Step 2
Place the plywood on the snow with the edge of the wood meeting the garbage can. Adjust the packed snow base to find the desired incline and use sheet-metal screws to attach the plywood to the garbage can.
Step 3
Pack snow around the front and back side of the ramp, completely covering all of the materials. Use a generous amount of snow and be sure it is hard-packed.
Step 4
Build a landing area by shoveling piles of soft snow behind the ramp.
Step 5
Test the ramp at slow speeds to make sure it is stable before hitting it with full force.

Tips & Warnings

 
Jumping on a snow ramp can be dangerous. Clear the landing area of any sharp or hard objects and wear a helmet. Do not build a ramp in a avalanche area and use the ramp in a supervised situation.

Article Written By Zach Lazzari

Zach Lazzari is an outdoor writing specialist. He has experience in website writing as well as standard newspaper writing. He wrote an outdoor column for the Silver World in Lake City, Colo., and articles for Colorado-mountain-adventure.com. Lazzari is currently completing his bachelor's degree online through Arizona State University and lives in southwest Montana.

Don't Miss a Thing!

All our latest outdoor content delivered to your inbox once a week.

FREE UPDATES

Subscribe

We promise to keep your email address safe and secure.