How to Buy Children's Snowboarding Boots

How to Buy Children's Snowboarding Boots
Most children are not adept at sizing their footwear; they can pick out what looks good but give vague answers about fit. While this works for sneakers, it won't work for snowboard boots because the boots need to fit tightly. Work closely with your child to find a good fit so he can get the most out of his experience on the slopes.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Step 1
Ask your child to put on socks that he will wear while snowboarding. These should be heavy, non-cotton wool or fleece socks.
Step 2
Take your child to a nearby shop that sells snowboard boots. Many large sports stores also sell snowboard equipment.
Step 3
Have your child's feet measured at the shop. A child's feet grow so fast, so it's best to use a fresh measurement.
Step 4
Request a few pairs of boots in your child's size. Snowboard boot sizes are the same as shoe sizes.
Step 5
Feel the backs of the boots for stiffness. Aim for a boot that is a bit softer over one that is stiff to help your child transition into the sport more easily.
Step 6
Have your child put both boots on. He should tighten both the inner and outer boot. As he puts them on, pay attention to how easy or difficult the boots are to fasten. If he can't get them tight or has to ask you for help, you might want to look for an easier pair. For the easiest experience, look for one-pull or BOA cable systems over laces.
Step 7
Make sure that both the inner and outer boot on both the left and right feet are secured as tight as possible.
Step 8
Feel for your child's toes. They should be barely touching the front of the boot, but not scrunched or curled. Feel the rest of the foot to make sure the boot seems snug. The foot should not have a lot of room to move around, and the boot should be nice and snug.
Step 9
Have your child stand up. Kneel behind him and hold down the heels of each boot. Ask him to bend his knees and lean forward onto his toes. Feel the boots to make sure that his heels don't slide up inside. You want the heels to remain firmly planted.
Step 10
Ask your child to walk around the store. Make sure the boots do not hurt his feet. The boots probably won't be comfortable the first time he walks in them, but be sure they don't squeeze his feet or cause pain.
Step 11
Double check the heels after your child has walked around for a couple of minutes. Repeat Step 8.
Step 12
Have your child take the boots off. Consider how well the laces loosen and how easily the boots come off. You don't want your child pulling and kicking for a long time to get the boots off.
Step 13
Double check that your child likes the boots. Fit is the most important aspect and ease of use is the second, but it's still important that your child likes the boots. Once you find boots that your child likes and that fit and are easy to put on and take off, you can make the purchase with confidence.

Tips & Warnings

 
You don't want to purchase boots that are too big; however, many boots for children have removable shims or other adjustable fit systems to provide room for growth. Look for these features to ensure the boots last for more than one season. If you can't find a shop nearby that sells snowboarding boots, order online, but verify that the retailer takes returns. Once the boots arrive, proceed through the fitting process to be sure they fit. Don't rely on shoe size.
 
You don't want to purchase boots that are too big; however, many boots for children have removable shims or other adjustable fit systems to provide room for growth. Look for these features to ensure the boots last for more than one season.
 
If you can't find a shop nearby that sells snowboarding boots, order online, but verify that the retailer takes returns. Once the boots arrive, proceed through the fitting process to be sure they fit. Don't rely on shoe size.
 
Boots that don't fit can be uncomfortable, difficult to control and dangerous.

Article Written By Joe Fletcher

Joe Fletcher has been a writer since 2002, starting his career in politics and legislation. He has written travel and outdoor recreation articles for a variety of print and online publications, including "Rocky Mountain Magazine" and "Bomb Snow." He received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rutgers College.

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