How to Fish With Streamers

How to Fish With Streamers
Tom Brokaw once said, "If fishing is like religion, then fly fishing is high church." Indeed, fly fishing is considered the high art of fishing, and streamers are the preferred medium. A streamer is an artificial lure that mimics a small fish or insect. Instead of dipping and wriggling in the water like some lures, streamers drift with and ride the current, looking to a fish like an insect that landed in the water or a minnow. Coupled with correct techniques, a streamer can be an effective fly-fishing lure .
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Fly rod and reel
  • Appropriate line for the size fish
  • Streamer lures
 
Step 1
Tie the fly onto the line using either a blood or cinch knot. A blood knot is tied by making a loop through the eye of the hook. Then wrap the line around the top of the loop and pull tightly. Make a cinch knot by pulling the line through the eye of the hook twice and wrapping the end around the line three times. Bring the line back through the loops and pull.
Step 2
If you are on shore, cast about 20 feet into the water. If you are in a boat, quickly cast toward the shore. This is a simple cast and a minimal amount of movement is best.
Step 3
Avoid smaller fish chasing the fly by letting the current do the work. Don't drag or jerk the line; you may spook larger fish with unnatural movements.
Step 4
When targeting a fish, keep the streamer level with it. It's best, too, if you present the lure from a side, rather than head-on. The idea is to make the fly act naturally.
Step 5
Continue casting and reeling in. Practice sinking the lure to different depths with different movements. Every condition will need a different technique for success.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Try streamers in cold waters that have a variety of depths. When you attract the attention of a fish, present the lure from the side. It will appear more natural.
 
Try streamers in cold waters that have a variety of depths.
 
When you attract the attention of a fish, present the lure from the side. It will appear more natural.

Resources

Article Written By Catherine Rayburn-Trobaug

Catherine Rayburn-Trobaugh has been a writer and college writing professor since 1992. She has written for international companies, published numerous feature articles in the "Wilmington News-Journal," and won writing contests for her poetry and fiction. Rayburn-Trobaugh earned a Master of Arts in English from Wright State University.

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