How to Size a SCUBA Mask to Face Size

How to Size a SCUBA Mask to Face Size
You can find scuba masks in a variety of designs, colors and styles, but before deciding mask to purchase, it a test try to make sure it fits properly. For comfort as well as safety and an airtight fit, you need to have a scuba mask that is properly sized to your face. When getting a mask, ensure that it covers the nose, as that will help you to equalize the air space in your ears and the air between your face and the mask to avoid a "facial or ear squeeze" when you are diving.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Large facial mirror
  • Large facial mirror
Step 1
Find a scuba mask that has a nose compartment that allows enough room for your nose between the eye lenses. The width and length of the compartment should allow space for your nose with a little extra space so that you can blow out your nose when necessary.
Step 2
Check the depth of the mask by looking at the silicone skirting to determine whether you need a low profile (has a smaller skirt generally used for a smaller face, with close set eyes, nose and mouth) or high profile (has a larger skirt mostly used for the larger face, with wide set eyes, nose and mouth) scuba mask to fit the size of your face and consider your cheekbone area.
Step 3
Place the mask on your face and inhale through your nose to form a suction that will hold the mask in place without having your hands on the scuba mask or the silicone skirting.
Step 4
Leave the mask on for one minute, then pull gently against the mask to see if a secure seal has formed. If the mask removes easily or a vacuum is not possible, you will need to repeat these first steps with a different mask until you find one that will hold to your face comfortably and snugly.
Step 5
Look in the mirror to see that the nose compartment has room below your nose and also see how close the silicone skirting is to your upper lip. If it is too close (dependent upon your comfort for the fit of the mask), you need a shorter scuba mask or a low-profile model.
Step 6
Confirm that the mask fits your face properly and doesn't extend past your cheekbones or the mask won't fit correctly and the seal won't hold.
Step 7
Grin while you are looking in the mirror and see whether a gap forms above your upper lip. Keep in mind that no gaps should be evident in the scuba mask while making any normal facial motions. If there are gaps, try a different mask for the proper fit.

Tips & Warnings

 
Test your scuba mask in a swimming pool or bathtub to make sure that you have picked the correct fit. Sometimes, you can exchange the scuba mask if it hasn't been used in salt water and you just purchased it. Purchase an additional strap for your mask and a case to keep the mask from getting scratched during transport. You can get single and double straps. The double straps give you more room for adjusting the mask.
 
Test your scuba mask in a swimming pool or bathtub to make sure that you have picked the correct fit. Sometimes, you can exchange the scuba mask if it hasn't been used in salt water and you just purchased it.
 
Purchase an additional strap for your mask and a case to keep the mask from getting scratched during transport. You can get single and double straps. The double straps give you more room for adjusting the mask.
 
Avoid scuba masks that are too small or cause too tight of a vacuum. You can get facial bruising and it can be more difficult to breathe underwater at deep depths. If a red mark remains on your face after trying your scuba mask on, it is probably too tight.
 
Avoid scuba masks that are too small or cause too tight of a vacuum. You can get facial bruising and it can be more difficult to breathe underwater at deep depths. If a red mark remains on your face after trying your scuba mask on, it is probably too tight.

Article Written By Michelle Nesbit

Michelle Nesbit started her writing career in 1999, when she wrote "The Title Searcher's Handbook." Nesbit has written for The Chattanoogan, Healthmad and several clients who secure her services as a ghostwriter. Nesbit's background includes licenses in Insurance, certification as a Rescue and Technical Scuba Diver, Underwater Photographer, and a clinical hypnotherapist. Nesbit is currently completing studies as a clinical nutritionist.

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