How to Camp in a Tent

How to Camp in a Tent
If you want a true view of nature, go camping in a tent. As long as you are properly prepared, tent camping is an adventure the whole family can enjoy. From planning the trip to spending time together at the campsite, camping can be an educational adventure for the entire family. And with all the modern conveniences now available, tent camping can be quite comfortable --- even for those who spend most of their time indoors.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Tent Tarp(s) Air mattresses Bedding Camping stove Grill Utensils Tablecloth Cooler(s) Plastic storage container Weather-appropriate clothing Comfortable shoes Lantern Flashlight Ax First-aid kit Bug spray Sunscreen Camping chair(s)
  • Tent
  • Tarp(s)
  • Air mattresses
  • Bedding
  • Camping stove
  • Grill
  • Utensils
  • Tablecloth
  • Cooler(s)
  • Plastic storage container
  • Weather-appropriate clothing
  • Comfortable shoes
  • Lantern
  • Flashlight
  • Ax
  • First-aid kit
  • Bug spray
  • Sunscreen
  • Camping chair(s)
Step 1
Be sure to have a tent big enough to accommodate the number of people in your party. A good rule of thumb is to use a tent that says it holds two more people than you plan to house. This will give you plenty of space for sleeping, changing and storing your belongings.
Step 2
Bring at least one tarp with you to place over your tent if it rains. Placing a second tarp under the tent before setting it up prevent ground moisture leaking through.
Step 3
Place air mattresses underneath your sleeping bags inside the tent. Air mattresses are a modern convenience that offer a cushioned sleeping surface and raise you off the ground, where moisture might collect. Air mattresses come in sizes from twin to king. You can even get an electronic air pump so you don't have to use your lungs to blow up the mattresses.
Step 4
Bring enough bedding to cover the mattresses. Also place a layer of bedding under each mattress to create an extra layer of warmth. Remember, it is easier to make yourself cooler by removing bedding than it is to warm up if you don't have enough to cover yourself.
Step 5
Pack drinks and perishable food items in a cooler and nonperishable items in a large plastic storage container with a lid to protect them from getting wet or crushed. A propane-powered camping stove or a charcoal grill make cooking easier than preparing foods over an open campfire. Be sure to pack cooking tools, utensils and a tablecloth. Paper plates can be burned in the campfire after use, which makes cleanup easier.
Step 6
Bring enough clothing to be prepared for weather changes. It is generally cooler in the woods at night, so you'll want to have something to keep you warm. Pack a poncho in case it rains. If you plan to go hiking, make sure to bring comfortable shoes. Flip-flops are easy to remove when going in and out of the tent and are recommended when using public showers. Many camping areas have places to swim, so don't forget your bathing suit.
Step 7
Other items to pack include a first-aid kit, lanterns and flashlights, bug spray, sunscreen, camping chairs, an ax, a deck of cards or board games, a clothesline, matches, and trash bags. To make the trip even more comfortable for people who enjoy modern amenities, consider bringing items such as a battery-operated fan, a portable TV, a radio or MP3 player, a screened tent, hammocks, or cooking appliances designed for camping.

Tips & Warnings

 
Use a waterproofing spray on the outside of your tent (even if it says it's waterproofed) and apply seam sealer to all tent seams and the floor before you go camping. This offers extra protection when it rains. Freeze meats before packing them in the cooler. Use frozen water bottles as ice packs. When they melt, you'll have fresh drinking water.
 
Use a waterproofing spray on the outside of your tent (even if it says it's waterproofed) and apply seam sealer to all tent seams and the floor before you go camping. This offers extra protection when it rains.
 
Freeze meats before packing them in the cooler. Use frozen water bottles as ice packs. When they melt, you'll have fresh drinking water.

Article Written By Joyce Starr

Joyce Starr is a professional writer from Florida and owns a landscaping company and garden center. She has published articles about camping in Florida, lawn care and gardening and writes for a local gardening newsletter. She shares her love and knowledge of the outdoors and nature through her writing.

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