How to Pack a Cooler for Camping

How to Pack a Cooler for CampingThere's nothing like a good camping trip to escape from the monotony and tediousness of every day life. Enjoy a peaceful, relaxing stay in nature without having to worry about emails, honking horns or conference calls. Of course, the camping trip won't be too good if you forget to pack your cooler or don't prepare properly. Packing your cooler is a key step toward getting ready for your camping adventure.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Step 1
Consider what you'll be carrying in your cooler. Two coolers is wise to allow one for drinks and one for food. This way, the cooler that holds your food isn't constantly being opened and closed. This will also allow for more space to fit everything that you need.
Step 2
For drinks, fill the bottom of the cooler with ice. Then put in all your cans and fill the cooler the rest of the way with ice. Keeping the drinks immersed in ice will ensure they're as cold as possible. Cubed ice works best for drinks, though for trips that last more than two days, you may consider using block ice to slow melting.
Step 3
For food, put the ice on the bottom of the cooler. Consider using block ice because it will melt more slowly. Alternately, use ice packs to prevent your food from getting wet and soggy from melting ice.
Step 4
Place your food on top of the ice. Use additional ice to cover any food that risks spoiling like hamburger patties. Make sure perishable foods are in contact with ice.
Step 5
Keep any glass jars or breakables on top of the cooler or in a place where they don't risk getting crushed and breaking all over your cooler.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Store food in plastic containers to prevent water from seeping into your food. Make your own ice packs by freezing water in milk jugs. Don't fill the jugs all the way, but allow some room for expansion. For longer trips, freeze food to keep it cool longer.
 
Store food in plastic containers to prevent water from seeping into your food.
 
Make your own ice packs by freezing water in milk jugs. Don't fill the jugs all the way, but allow some room for expansion.
 
For longer trips, freeze food to keep it cool longer.

Article Written By Joe Fletcher

Joe Fletcher has been a writer since 2002, starting his career in politics and legislation. He has written travel and outdoor recreation articles for a variety of print and online publications, including "Rocky Mountain Magazine" and "Bomb Snow." He received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rutgers College.

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