How to Make Ski Wax

How to Make Ski Wax
Ski wax is used on snow skis to create speed on downhill slopes, and is used on cross country skis to create less or more friction depending on the need. It can be purchased in jars or tubes at retail locations that sell ski equipment, but it can be pricey. It would be nice if you could make your own ski wax and have one less cost associated with an already rather expensive hobby. There are a few ways you could make your own wax. One of them doesn't take too much equipment or ingredients.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Double boiler Pine tar Shellac flakes Heat source to heat the double boiler
  • Double boiler
  • Pine tar
  • Shellac flakes
  • Heat source to heat the double boiler
Step 1
Set up the double boiler outside so the fumes do not affect you while the wax is heating.
Step 2
Put the pine tar in the boiler to let it heat up and become more fluid.
Step 3
Add the shellac flakes to the tar until the consistency is like threads being pulled apart. It will be sticky to the touch, so use gloves and try not to touch a lot of other things while dealing with it.
Step 4
At this point you have a good wax similar to klister. If you want a more base wax, add more tar to the heat. The wax's threadlike quality will subside somewhat. Do not add so much tar that the mixture becomes loose.

Tips & Warnings

 
You can experiment after you make the basic wax. Try adding small amounts of graphite, powdered Teflon or other substances to create less friction. There is another way to make wax using petroleum jelly, microwax, paraffin wax and fisher tropsch wax. There is no set rule as to how much of each is mixed to make ski wax with these ingredients, and experimentation will be required to get it right. But it should be known that petroleum jelly is the softest, paraffin is harder, microwax is still harder, and fisher tropsch is the hardest of the waxes. Hard wax is better for colder conditions but is not the best for new snow.
 
You can experiment after you make the basic wax. Try adding small amounts of graphite, powdered Teflon or other substances to create less friction.
 
There is another way to make wax using petroleum jelly, microwax, paraffin wax and fisher tropsch wax. There is no set rule as to how much of each is mixed to make ski wax with these ingredients, and experimentation will be required to get it right. But it should be known that petroleum jelly is the softest, paraffin is harder, microwax is still harder, and fisher tropsch is the hardest of the waxes. Hard wax is better for colder conditions but is not the best for new snow.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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