How to Add Serrations to a Pocket Knife

How to Add Serrations to a Pocket Knife
There are some jobs in which a regular knife blade just won't cut it (pun intended). For such jobs, a serrated blade gets the job done quickly and safely. By turning one of your straight knife blades into a partially serrated blade you can save yourself the expense of buying a new serrated blade.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Turning a Reguler Blade into a Serrated Blade

Things You’ll Need:
  • Knife blade Safety googles Vice or clamp Two small pieces of wood or cardboard Chain saw file or regular file Serrated blade sharpener Ruler Marker
  • Knife blade
  • Safety googles
  • Vice or clamp
  • Two small pieces of wood or cardboard
  • Chain saw file or regular file
  • Serrated blade sharpener
  • Ruler
  • Marker
Step 1
Begin by donning safety goggles and locking your knife solidly into place by placing it in a vice or clamp. Put cardboard or small pieces of wood into parts of the knife that will be exposed to the vice or clamp to prevent scraping or bending.
Step 2
Take a ruler and measure out evenly the marks in which you will file into the blade. Use a marker to write directly on the blade the exact locations in which you will file.
Step 3
Write a straight line horizontally on the blade marking out how high up you file on the blade. I suggest only serrating the bottom quarter or third of the knife (depending on the blade length). That way the blade can be used as both a straight blade and a serrated blade, depending on the task.
Step 4
Begin filing the blade in the locations you have pre-marked with your mark. File to the just below the horizontal line you made on the blade.
Step 5
Finish the serrations by using a knife sharpener designed for serrated blades.

Tips & Warnings

 
Locking the knife in on both blade and handle side will ensure the blade is firmly locked in and will not slip or bend while you are filing. Practice on an old blade before you try customizing a new or nice piece of cutlery.
 
Locking the knife in on both blade and handle side will ensure the blade is firmly locked in and will not slip or bend while you are filing.
 
Practice on an old blade before you try customizing a new or nice piece of cutlery.
 
I recommend not using a dremel tool. The high speed and vibration may weaken or bend the blade. Additionally, the high speed may heat the blade and cause it to contort. Use caution, you are working the blade of knife.
 
I recommend not using a dremel tool. The high speed and vibration may weaken or bend the blade. Additionally, the high speed may heat the blade and cause it to contort.
 
Use caution, you are working the blade of knife.

Resources

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