How to Make a Knife Out of Rock

How to Make a Knife Out of Rock
Stone was one of the earliest-tool making materials known to man. Whatever a cave man can do, a modern man can learn with only a little patience. Making a knife out of rock only requires the choice of the right rock, a little attention, and enough time to do the job right. This procedure makes for a good school project or a survival technique.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Roughly knife-shaped piece of flint or obsidian Geology guide (optional) Stone or metal chisel Stone or metal flaking tool Hammer, or a stone to use as one Cloth or leather for wrapping
  • Roughly knife-shaped piece of flint or obsidian
  • Geology guide (optional)
  • Stone or metal chisel
  • Stone or metal flaking tool
  • Hammer, or a stone to use as one
  • Cloth or leather for wrapping
Step 1
Find a piece of flint or obsidian. These are the best rocks for blade-making, as they yield the sharpest edge. A geology guide will give you types on where and how to find these stones. However, most stones will do in a pinch. Choose something that is already knife-sharped, as this will greatly reduce the amount of time you spend chiseling the stone.
Step 2
Shape the knife by chiseling it. This is done in firm strikes. Do not hit the chisel too hard, or you will shatter the stone. Choosing a good stone will minimize the time spent on this step.
Step 3
Form the knife's blade with the flaking tool. Once the shape is established, you will need to chisel the generally formed blade down to a good edge that is as fine and center-lined as possible.
Step 4
Use a whetstone, or a stone with a rough surface, to sharpen the edge. Sandstone is a good choice, as it has gritty surface. Draw the blade edge back along the sandstone about half a dozen times, then switch sides and give it one draw. Stone blades are pretty crude, so they cannot be honed as much as a metal blade.
Step 5
Wrap the base up in cloth or leather. If you are using flint or obsidian, it is likely to have sharp edges naturally, and without a handle-wrapping you are liable to scrape your hand when you use the knife.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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