How to Patch Gore-Tex

How to Patch Gore-TexGore-Tex is one of the leading materials for keeping backpackers, mountaineers, climbers and skiers protected from the elements. In the back country however, if you are actually using your Gore-Tex jackets, pants or packs, then they will eventually see some wear and tear. Ice axes and crampons are especially common culprits for creating tears that need repair. Luckily, with a small repair kit, it is easy to patch your Gore-Tex.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Sheet of Gore-Tex for patching
  • Scissors
  • Seam seal
  • Small bristle brush
 
Step 1
Clean the area that needs repair by softly washing with warm soapy water and letting it fully dry. If you are on a trip and don't have soap, that is fine.
Step 2
Clip any fraying that may have come loose since the rip occurred.
Step 3
Cut a patch from the Gore-Tex sheet in your repair kit that is slightly larger than the size of the cut or rip you need to cover. As you cut, round the edges of your patch as much as possible because square corners are more likely to peel up. If you can cover the tear with a circle or oval shape patch then this works the best.
Step 4
Use a seam seal, such as McNetts Seam Grip, by brushing it on with a small bristle brush or smearing it on with an applicator stick. Spread a thin layer of the seam seal over the entire back of the patch and then place it over the tear.
Step 5
Finish off sealing the patch by brushing on a thin layer of seam seal around the edge of the patch to deter the edges from peeling up. Press the entire area of the patch down firmly with your thumbnail so that the two layers of Gore-Tex adhere together.
Step 6
Set a heavy object over the patch so that it dries flat. Let dry completely before using again. Repairing Gore-Tex the night before you need to use it is best.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Wear a latex glove and spread the seam seal with a finger if you don't have a brush. This way you also don't have to clean the brush and can simply throw away the glove.

Article Written By Naomi Judd

Naomi M. Judd is a naturalist, artist and writer. Her work has been published in various literary journals, newspapers and websites. Judd holds a self-designed Bachelor of Arts in adventure writing from Plymouth State University and is earning a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the University of Southern Maine.

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