How to Make a Surf Rig for Striped Bass

How to Make a Surf Rig for Striped Bass
Fishing for striped bass in the surf is both challenging and exciting. Striped bass are a much-sought-after and prized saltwater game fish pursued by many fishermen along the U.S. Atlantic coast. Fishing for stripers requires using a 9-foot or longer surf rod, 15 lb. test or higher big game monofilament line and a special rig for presenting the bait to the fish. One of the challenges involved in striper fishing is presenting the bait in a manner that the bass will take and not be spooked by the associated weight.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • 50 inches of 20 lb. test big game monofilament line 3-way barrel swivel Sinker swivel snap Cigar float 4/0 bait holder hook
  • 50 inches of 20 lb. test big game monofilament line
  • 3-way barrel swivel
  • Sinker swivel snap
  • Cigar float
  • 4/0 bait holder hook
Step 1
Tie one end of the monofilament line to the three-way swivel. Use a clinch knot to tie the line to the swivel. Pass the end of the line through one of the swivel eyes allowing 3 to 4 inches of line to extend from the eye. Twist the loose end around the main line for six to eight turns, and pass the line through the loop formed above the eye of the swivel. Moisten the knot, pull tight and trim any excess line.
Step 2
Attach a sinker snap to one of the two remaining eyes of the swivel. Open the snap and insert the end through the eye of the swivel and slide back to the bend of the snap. Close the snap to prevent it from coming loose from the rig.
Step 3
Slide the cigar float onto the line by passing the free end of the line through the center of the float. The float should be between 3 and 4 inches in length. Do not peg or make the float stationery since it is important for the float to have the ability to move freely along the length of the leader.
Step 4
Attach a 4/0 bait holder hook to the free end of the line. The best method is to tie the line to the hook with a snell knot. Pass the free end of the line through the eye of the hook, form a loop just larger than the hook and pass the line back through the eye. Wrap the large formed loop around the hook for five to seven turns and gradually reduce the size of the knot by pulling the tag, or loose end, and the main line. Moisten the knot and pull tight.
Step 5
Double-check all of the knots, attach a 2 to 3 oz. weight to the weight snap, put appropriate bait such as blood worm, shrimp or a sand flea on the hook and the rig is complete.

Tips & Warnings

 
Make sure all of the knots are securely tied. Knots are oftentimes the cause for losing a fish.
 
Use care when tying knots because tightly stretched monofilament lines are capable of producing cuts and abrasions.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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