How to Clean Old Fishing Lures

How to Clean Old Fishing Lures
There are different reasons for cleaning old fishing lures. It may be a need for removing accumulations of debris, rust and corrosion prior to use, or it may be necessary to do so when collecting older lures as a hobby. Regardless of the reason, older lures may feature designs or paint schemes which are no longer being produced. Restoring an old lure can be both enjoyable and rewarding.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Small stiff brush Mild abrasive cleanser such as soft scrub Metal polish such as magic wadding Clean soft cloth Soap and water Small, fine file Spray lubricant such as WD-40
  • Small stiff brush
  • Mild abrasive cleanser such as soft scrub
  • Metal polish such as magic wadding
  • Clean soft cloth
  • Soap and water
  • Small, fine file
  • Spray lubricant such as WD-40
 
Step 1
Wipe down the entire lure using a cloth and a mild soapy solution. Remove as much debris and stains as possible. Rinse the lure with clean water.
Step 2
Brush any stubborn stains or heavy debris with a small stiff brush. Be careful to not use a brush which will damage the finish of a lure as many are painted.
Step 3
Apply a small amount of mild abrasive cleaner to a cloth and work into stubborn stains on the finish of the lure as well as any metal parts. Rinse excess cleaner with water.
Step 4
Use a mild metal polish (perhaps magic wadding) to polish metal parts such as spinner blades, hooks, wires and other parts. Wipe the metal parts thoroughly with a clean cloth and polish to a shine.
Step 5
Use a small and fine file to lightly restore the hone to hooks which may be tarnished or rusted. Apply a thin film of oil such as WD-40 to ward off future rust.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Work carefully with old lures which are painted. To preserve the original finish and details such as scales or eyes, a light touch and mild cleaners are required.
 
Use caution when handling and working with old lures. There may be rusty parts which can cause nasty cuts and abrasions. Use caution when handling cleaners.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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