How to Grind on a Snowboard

How to Grind on a Snowboard
Grinding is one of the more intimidating aspects of snowboarding when you're just getting started. Until now, you've only had to worry about landing on snow, but now you're staring at a piece of solid metal. While it's intimidating, you'll never be out there jibbing off of everything in your path until you go for it. The 50/50 grind is the most basic grind and an obvious starting point for a first-time jibber.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Step 1
Find an appropriate rail. For your first time, make it a low, short, straight rail that doesn't require too much air to get on. Some rails are even so low that you can just ride straight off the snow.
Step 2
Consider a practice run. Some people like to plan it out visually, others just like to swallow their fear and go for it. If you want to get a better feel for the rail, ride past it once or twice, check out the approach and the landing and even try ollying next to the rail to get a visual feel.
Step 3
Approach the rail, maintain control but keep your speed up; you don't want to lose momentum in the middle of your grind. Keep the knees bent and weight centered.
Step 4
Ride at the rail head on with your board flat and aimed straight at the middle of the rail. Lean some weight back on your rear foot and ollie up onto the rail. Absorb the impact with your knees, and keep them bent.
Step 5
Keep the board parallel with the rail and centered on it. Also keep your weight centered and your shoulders over the rail, pointed down the rail. Grind it out; you should be smiling by now.
Step 6
Ride straight off the rail or do a little ollie off depending on the landing area.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
If you feel off balance on the rail, jump off before you crash. It's better to jump to the side than to come crashing down on the rail. Practice grinding that same rail a number of times. Once you have it down, move on to some more difficult rails and more advanced grinds.
 
If you feel off balance on the rail, jump off before you crash. It's better to jump to the side than to come crashing down on the rail.
 
Practice grinding that same rail a number of times. Once you have it down, move on to some more difficult rails and more advanced grinds.

Article Written By Joe Fletcher

Joe Fletcher has been a writer since 2002, starting his career in politics and legislation. He has written travel and outdoor recreation articles for a variety of print and online publications, including "Rocky Mountain Magazine" and "Bomb Snow." He received a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Rutgers College.

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