Snowboard Dry Land Training

Snowboard Dry Land Training
Staying in snowboarding shape in the off-season starts with some dry land training exercises. You can work on your stance and edging techniques while improving on your core strength and endurance. If you are new to snowboarding, dry land training is also a smart way to learn a few simple techniques before hitting the snow. Experts can use dry land training to stay ahead of the competition and prevent sore backs and muscle injury. You can purchase optional equipment like Bosu balls or just hit your gym to try the exercises below.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • Snowboard Yoga mat Stability ball Bosu balls Chin-up bar Running shoes
  • Snowboard
  • Yoga mat
  • Stability ball
  • Bosu balls
  • Chin-up bar
  • Running shoes
Step 1
Stand in a relaxed position with your feet shoulder width apart. Slightly bend your knees and turn your shoulders toward the front of your imaginary snowboard. If you already have a snowboard, go ahead and strap in and practice standing and getting position to get accustomed to the balance. If you don't have a snowboard, try one on at a sporting retailer to learn how your feet will actually be positioned.
Step 2
Take your stance on a flat surface in your bare feet and rock from your toes to your heels for at least five minutes. This dry land training exercise will help get a feel for edging through the snow. You can also clip into your board and practice. If you're falling forward or backward on your board, you are applying too much pressure or leaning too far. Gradually ease how far you lean and find your balance.
Step 3
Sit down on a carpeted floor or yoga mat with your legs extended in front of you and slide your feet toward your bottom. Keep your arms and palms on the floor behind you and lift your rear off the floor and try to stand up. This is a key dry land training activity. Beginners and novices will spend a lot of time wiping out and sitting in the snow. You need to learn how to stand back up from a sitting position. It also helps build up your leg and rear muscles.
Step 4
Work on back extension exercises with a stability ball. Place the ball under your abdomen and keep your toes lined up to the wall behind you. Lift yourself up and then back down over the ball. Keep your back straight and do not bend all the way over the ball. The twists, turns and spills of snowboarding often lead to a sore or stiff back. You can prevent the pain by doing 20 reps of back extensions a day and slowly blending them into your fitness routine.
Step 5
Use Bosu balls to learn balance on a shifting surface. Bosu balls are available at most fitness retailers and at your gym and look like large balls that were cut in half. Practice jumping up and down on them and keeping balance. Line up five or six Bosu balls in a row and run down them and back again.
Step 6
Hang on a chin-up bar and lift your legs in the air as high as you can. Keep your back as straight as possible and raise your toes level to your head. This helps build your core muscles and build strength.
Step 7
Start an aerobic workout routine of jogging or biking for about an hour a day three or four times a week. Snowboarding will easily wind anyone out of shape and is even challenging for exercise enthusiasts. Getting use to an aerobic routine will help when you hit the slopes on your board.

Tips & Warnings

 
If you're a beginner, spend time watching snowboarding videos and reading about new techniques.
 
Consult a doctor before starting any fitness routine. Dryl and training should not take the place of snowboarding lessons for beginners.
 
Consult a doctor before starting any fitness routine.
 
Dryl and training should not take the place of snowboarding lessons for beginners.

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