How to Replace a Blade on a Pocket Knife

How to Replace a Blade on a Pocket Knife
Replacing the blade of a standard pocket knife may take a little dexterity, but it's usually a straightforward process. Many pocket knives have easy-to-remove screws that allow you to separate the handle, or scales, of the knife and access the blade.

That said, before you attempt to access the internal workings of any pocket knife, note that certain models---knives with no access screws, open-assist knives and automatic knives---should only be repaired by the manufacturer or by an expert.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Driver with bit that matches the screws (flat-head, Phillips or Torx)
  • Lubricating oil
  • Replacement blade
Step 1
Determine the manufacturer of the knife, the knife model and number and any other identifying characteristics that may help when ordering a new blade. It may be necessary to separate the knife handles and remove the blade for identification.
Step 2
Contact the manufacturer of the knife to request a replacement blade. Typically, manufacturers charge for replacement blades, as well as for shipping and handling.
Step 3
Access the knife blade by removing all of the screws along the edge of the handle and at the pivot point (the spot at which the blade is connected to the handle). Use an appropriate driver bit depending on the type of screw used by the manufacturer.
Step 4
Carefully separate the handles, or scales, to access the blade. Carefully note the placement of any internal parts so that you may correctly reassemble the knife once you replace the blade.
Step 5
Remove the damaged blade and replace it with the new blade. Apply a small amount of lubricating oil to the pivot point of the knife blade and reassemble the pocket knife.

Tips & Warnings

 
After reassembling the knife, make sure the blade moves freely. If the blade sticks, make adjustments to the assembly screws and to the main pivot point screw.
 
Use extreme caution when handling knife blades. New blades are particularly dangerous, as they'll have been honed very sharp by the manufacturer.

Article Written By Tara Dooley

Tara Dooley has written for various websites since 2008. She has worked as an accountant, after-school director and retail manager in various locations. Dooley holds a Bachelor of Science in business management and finance.

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