How to Tighten Canoe Rivets

How to Tighten Canoe Rivets
Canoeing is great fun, and modern aluminum canoes are built to last for many years with proper care and maintenance. However, wear and tear does cause the inevitable leak, and a major culprit in aluminum canoe leaks is the loose rivet. Usually these rivets can be tightened up after only a few minutes' work with a hammer, but you will need an extra pair of hands to do the job right.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Things You’ll Need:
  • 1 work partner
  • At least 2 saw horses
  • Lead pipe or brick
  • Hammer
Step 1
Pick up the canoe and carry it over to a pair of sawhorses. Set it on the sawhorses keel-down. Unless you are very strong, this will be a lot easier with an extra pair of hands. Other steps will also require a second set of hands, so do this job with a partner.
Step 2
Pour some water into the canoe and take note of which rivets are leaking. With that established, turn the canoe over so the keel is facing up.
Step 3
Tell your helper to stand on the outside of canoe and place a lead pipe, brick or something else they can use to help push down on and brace with against the outside of the leaky rivet.
Step 4
Crawl under the canoe and strike the other side of the leaky rivet with the hammer.
Step 5
Repeat the process for all leaky rivets. Flip the canoe back over and see if the leaks are fixed by pouring more water into the boat. Repeat the whole process again for any rivets that are still leaking.

Tips & Warnings

 
Rivets that do not respond to tightening may require replacement. If you have tried tightening two or three times with no results, don't waste any more time with tightening the rivet. Drill it out and put a new one in.

Article Written By Edwin Thomas

Edwin Thomas has been writing since 1997. His work has appeared in various online publications, including The Black Table, Proboxing-Fans and others. A travel blogger, editor and writer, Thomas has traveled from Argentina to Vietnam in pursuit of stories. He holds a Master of Arts in international affairs from American University.

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