How to Make Kayak Sail

How to Make Kayak Sail
If you enjoy kayaking, you may be interested in adding a sail to your kayak as an alternative to paddling. A sail can also be used a backup when you get tired from paddling and need to rest for a bit. Whether a novice kayaker or a more experienced one, making and adding your own sail to your kayak can help you use wind power to propel you toward your kayaking destination.

Instructions

Difficulty: Challenging

Things You’ll Need:
  • 2 yards of nylon fabric (60 inches wide) Scissors Rope Hook clips Pencil Sewing machine and thread 4 36-inch pieces of PVC pipe--1/2-inch diameter 6 90-degree 1/2-inch PVC T connectors 2 PVC joint connectors--1/2 inch 1 PVC 3/4-inch joint connector PVC cement glue 3 feet of 1-inch nylon straps Needle and thread
  • 2 yards of nylon fabric (60 inches wide)
  • Scissors
  • Rope
  • Hook clips
  • Pencil
  • Sewing machine and thread
  • 4 36-inch pieces of PVC pipe--1/2-inch diameter
  • 6 90-degree 1/2-inch PVC T connectors
  • 2 PVC joint connectors--1/2 inch
  • 1 PVC 3/4-inch joint connector
  • PVC cement glue
  • 3 feet of 1-inch nylon straps
  • Needle and thread
Step 1
Prepare fabric. Place the sail fabric on the floor or on a flat surface. Turn the fabric so that the longest side of the fabric creates the horizontal line of the piece.
Step 2
Fold sail fabric. Grab the left corner of the fabric and fold it over toward the right side of the fabric. This will double the fabric and create fabric dimensions of 26 inches by 60 inches. Push on the fabric enough to create a crease mark where it is folded. Use a pencil to trace the fabric fold lines that have been created.
Step 3
Fold fabric again. Grab the upper left corner of the fabric and fold it toward the center of the fabric until the fold reaches the upper right corner of the fabric. Push on the fabric enough to create a crease mark where it is folded. Use a pencil to trace the fabric fold lines that have been created.
Step 4
Fold to the right. Grab the upper right corner and fold it toward the center of the fabric until the fold reaches the upper left corner of the fabric. Push on the fabric enough to create a crease mark where it is folded. Use a pencil to trace the fabric fold lines that have been created.
Step 5
Cut the fabric. Grab the left-hand corner of the parallelogram shape that has been formed by the folding and fold it over so that it creates a fold that is six inches long. Cut along the folded edge so that it creates a hole.
Step 6
Sew. Using a sewing machine, sew around the upper edge of the sail so that you're sewing the overlapping pieces together.
Step 7
Assemble PVC. Before you glue any of the PVC pieces together, assemble it first. Place one ½-inch joint connector on each of the 36-inch pieces of PVC pipe. On one of the pipes, place a ¾-inch joint connector over one of the ½-inch joint connectors. When glued together, this will be the bottom of the mast. On the other two ends, place the PVC T connectors. The PVC pipe will stick out in the center of the T connectors. The opening of the barrel (of the T connectors) will create right angles with the PVC pipe. Add T connectors to the two remaining pieces of pipe, The barrel (of the two T connectors) will create right angles to each other but at opposite ends of the pipe.
Step 8
Glue the PVC frame. Once you have assembled the PVC pipes in a trial run, make sure everything fits together properly. Glue each piece of the PVC frame, using PVC cement glue.
Step 9
Attach sail to frame. Cut a 10-inch piece of strap and weave the strap through the barrels of the three T portions of the pipe system. Place the corner of the sail material in between the two strap ends and sew the fabric in between the two straps. It's probably easier to sew this together by hand rather than using the sewing machine. Pass the six-inch pieces of strap through the T connectors and overlap the straps, securing the fabric to the pipes. Arrange the fabric sail so that the PVC piping system acts as the sail frame. Be sure the hole you created from cutting the fabric is at the bottom portion of the sail as this allows for draining.

Article Written By Kristie Lorette

Kristie Lorette started writing professionally in 1996. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in marketing and multinational business from Florida State University and a Master of Business Administration from Nova Southeastern University. Her work has appeared online at Bill Savings, Money Smart Life and Mortgage Loan.

Keep Me Informed

Weekly newsletters, announcements and offers from Trails.com to your inbox.

Sign me up!

We HATE spam and promise to keep your email addresses safe and secure.