How to Get to the Alamo

How to Get to the Alamo
One of San Antonio's primary historical sites in a town with many, the Alamo is not just a piece of the past but a symbol of the state. Built in 1724 as a mission, the Alamo is most remembered as the site of the famous battle between the Texans and Mexicans in 1836, where the Texans held out for 13 days before finally facing defeat. Great names at the battle included included Davy Crockett and James Bowie, men whose names long ago passed from history and into legend. Explore the grounds and gardens or head out for a long hike along the nearby historic River Walk.

Instructions

Difficulty: Easy

Step 1
Take Interstate 37 into downtown San Antonio. Pay attention to whether you are traveling on the northbound or southbound side of the highway.
Step 2
Get off the highway at Houston Street, Exit 141a, if you are traveling south. Exit the highway at Commerce Street, Exit 140b, if you are traveling north.
Step 3
Turn right onto Houston Street or left onto Commerce Street after exiting. Head west on the applicable street.
Step 4
On Houston Street, continue to head west for three blocks. Make a left turn on E Street and continue south on E Street until you reach the Alamo at Alamo Plaza and the public parking lot.
Step 5
From Commerce Street, continue driving west for 10 blocks. Make a right turn on Alamo Plaza and continue for 1.5 blocks to reach the parking lot.
Step 6
Pull into one of the public pay lots. Bring cash to pay for the day's parking.

Tips & Warnings

 
Admission to the Alamo is free. It relies on donations and gift shop sales for funding. The Alamo is open daily, but check before going to verify the hours it is open, which change seasonally.
 
Admission to the Alamo is free. It relies on donations and gift shop sales for funding.
 
The Alamo is open daily, but check before going to verify the hours it is open, which change seasonally.

Article Written By Jenny Harrington

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

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