How to Fish in Alaska on a Budget

How to Fish in Alaska on a Budget
One of the most sought-after fishing destinations in the world is Alaska. Here, some of the largest and most readily available salmon, northern pike, halibut and grayling are waiting to be caught. Many who travel to the area pay big bucks for the assistance of charter fishing excursions or personal guides. There are other ways to use area resources without having to pay top dollar for the entire price of the trip. By avoiding the high cost of hotels and catered activities, it is possible to fish Alaska on a budget.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

How to Fish in Alaska on a Budget

Things You’ll Need:
  • Camping reservations Fishing equipment, including waterproof boots or waders Topographic map of area Compass Camping equipment and supplies Hunting knife and fish fillet knife Under Armour fishing attire Life jacket Sunglasses Sunblock
  • Camping reservations
  • Fishing equipment, including waterproof boots or waders
  • Topographic map of area
  • Compass
  • Camping equipment and supplies
  • Hunting knife and fish fillet knife
  • Under Armour fishing attire
  • Life jacket
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunblock
Step 1
Prepare for the trip by mapping out the general location you want to fish, using outdoorsdirectory.com as a source. Popular locations include the Togiak and King Salmon Rivers in the southwest; American Creek and the Charley River in the south-central; Beaver Creek and the Delta River in the interior; and, in the northwest, the Black and Copper Rivers.
Step 2
Shop for fly fishing equipment and clothes at outfitters such as Cabela's, Bass Pro Shops or online at Trails.com.
Step 3
Check sport fish run availability by using the drop-down menu tool on the Alaska Department of Fish and Game website to see what types of fish will be running and when. This will serve as a beneficial tool to trip planning. Many fish in Alaska run from June through September. The drop-down menu tool will show the highest run times per location.
Step 4
Make reservations for an area campground. Choose a campground that is near the river, lake or tributary where the best fishing will be. Camping independently will save money as opposed to choosing a guide.
Step 5
Obtain an Alaskan fishing license at the local DNR office. This should be done before any fishing takes place.
Step 6
Arrive at the camp and begin setting up. Choose an area that is clear of debris. Assemble and erect the tent. Set up the camp cooking area by choosing a fire pit and putting up a tripod grill. Camping without a large commercial group will not only keep down the cost of the trip, but will increase the chances of catching more fish.
Step 7
Prepare for fishing by getting dressed in waterproof boots or waders, Under Armour dry clothing, sunglasses and sun block.
Step 8
Choose an inland stream with a rocky or sandy bottom. Locations that just drop off from a small fall or fallen tree trunks and large rocks are good areas to find king salmon and northern pike. Cast a line and begin fishing. Take the latest catch back to camp and store on ice until ready to cook.

Tips & Warnings

 
Choose areas such as the panhandle or southeast Alaska, where king, sockeye and coho salmon are plentiful. Rent kayaks to maneuver around to find fresh fishing spots---this is more affordable than renting a charter fishing boat. Choose primitive camping to save money on lodging. If backcountry camping, be sure to have a permit from the local DNR or state park office.
 
Choose areas such as the panhandle or southeast Alaska, where king, sockeye and coho salmon are plentiful.
 
Rent kayaks to maneuver around to find fresh fishing spots---this is more affordable than renting a charter fishing boat.
 
Choose primitive camping to save money on lodging.
 
If backcountry camping, be sure to have a permit from the local DNR or state park office.
 
Do not fish without a valid license. Be careful when setting up camp. Do not leave food out in the open, as this can attract bears, which are common in the Alaskan wilderness.
 
Do not fish without a valid license.
 
Be careful when setting up camp. Do not leave food out in the open, as this can attract bears, which are common in the Alaskan wilderness.

Article Written By Julie Boehlke

Julie Boehlke is a seasoned copywriter and content creator based in the Great Lakes state. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists. Boehlke has more than 10 years of professional writing experience on topics such as health and wellness, green living, gardening, genealogy, finances, relationships, world travel, golf, outdoors and interior decorating. She has also worked in geriatrics and hospice care.

Don't Miss a Thing!

All our latest outdoor content delivered to your inbox once a week.

FREE UPDATES

Subscribe

We promise to keep your email address safe and secure.