Sailboat Rope Splicing Instructions

Sailboat Rope Splicing Instructions
Knowing how to splice rope can save money and time, or even prove to be a life-saving skill in an emergency situation. The most common splices are the eye spice and the short splice. An eye splice makes a loop in the end of a rope that serves a range of purposes from rigging sails to tying up at the dock. The short splice connects two pieces of line to create a longer rope or the two ends of a single rope to make one big loop.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Eye Splice

Things You’ll Need:
  • 3-stranded rope Tape Measuring tape
  • 3-stranded rope
  • Tape
  • Measuring tape
Step 1
Measure up about 6 or 7 times the diameter of the rope (usually about 3 to 4 inches) and wrap a piece of tape tightly around the rope. Measure up from the piece of tape the length of the desired diameter of the loop. If the loop is to be 20 inches in diameter, measure up 20 inches and mark that length by wrapping it with tape.
Step 2
Pull the rope apart from the end so that the three strands are separated. Secure the ends with tape to prevent fraying.
Step 3
Bring the two taped areas together and gently twist the rope against the grain to create an opening. Tuck the first open strand through the opening.
Step 4
Tuck the other two strands, one at a time, going over the previously woven strand and under the next. Rotate the rope a half-turn and continue the process until the open strands are woven into the rope.
Step 5
Pull the ends tight and smooth out the rope by rubbing it between your hands.

Short splice

Step 1
Separate the strands on the end of each rope about 6 or 7 times the diameter of the rope (each end will be open a few inches, depending on the size of your rope). Wrap the ends with tape to prevent fraying.
Step 2
Point the six open strands of rope to face one another and interlace them so that each piece of rope is intertwined.
Step 3
Start with one side and begin weaving the open ends into the rope by pulling each open strand through the strands of the established rope. Pull each strand over the strand that was just woven and under the next strand in the rope. Rotate the rope a half-turn each time you return to the first strand.
Step 4
Pull the rope tight and repeat on the other side, weaving the strands over one and under one until you have reached the end.
Step 5
Tape down the two points where the ends of each rope finished to strengthen the juncture.

Tips & Warnings

 
Measurements need not be exact. Pull each crossing so that the weave is tight. Practice this technique several times at home so that you will be familiar with it in a rush.
 
Measurements need not be exact.
 
Pull each crossing so that the weave is tight.
 
Practice this technique several times at home so that you will be familiar with it in a rush.
 
Professional splicing is done by lasers; the strength, weight-load and durability of your rope may be impeded by homemade splicing. When spliced, bulkier ropes will not pass through a block.
 
Professional splicing is done by lasers; the strength, weight-load and durability of your rope may be impeded by homemade splicing.
 
When spliced, bulkier ropes will not pass through a block.

Resources

Article Written By Page Turner

Page Turner was destined to be a writer, publishing for the first time at the age of 14. Since that time, she has worked as an writer and editor for publications and websites including The Ray and The Howler. She has published her first children's book and founded a multi-lingual literary magazine while working as a communication studies scholar at the College of Charleston.

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