Hot Stone Cooking

Hot Stone CookingWhat has become a popular indoor culinary tool is a traditional method of outdoor cooking. Using heated stones over your campfire is a way to use natural resources and minimize your pack weight while on a trail hike or orienteering trip. The intense heat of stones seals in juices for meats and vegetables without using oil or fat for cooking while uniformly distributing heat for even cooking.
 

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • Flat stone Campfire Grease or vegetable oil Hot pads Cooking utensils
  • Flat stone
  • Campfire
  • Grease or vegetable oil
  • Hot pads
  • Cooking utensils
 
Step 1
Choose your cooking stone from a dry area, looking for at least one flat side. Your stone should be more than 1 inch thick to avoid cracking. Brush off any dirt with a damp cloth and inspect the stone for visible cracks.
Step 2
Build a low and wide campfire, placing stable rock supports within the fire ring that will allow the cooking stone to heat evenly 2 to 4 inches above the coals. Place the cooking stone onto the stone supports to heat for at least 60 minutes. Coat the stone with grease or vegetable oil.
Step 3
Place your food, such as meat, fish, vegetables, eggs or sliced potatoes, on the stone slab. Cook your food thoroughly to your desired taste.
Step 4
Remove the hot stone from the fire with the cooked food still on it. Since the stone will retain its heat for 30 minutes or more, it can be used as a hot plate or serving platter to keep your food warm.
Step 5
Clean the stone for reuse. Remove excess food and soak the stone slab in a container of warm soapy water for 20 to 30 minutes. Wipe down the stone and let it air dry and cool until your next meal.
 

Tips & Warnings

 
Look for granite, basalt and quartz rocks. They hold heat most effectively as outdoor cooking stones. Let the stone begin to cool before you soak it and use hot pads to move the stone to avoid burns.
 
Look for granite, basalt and quartz rocks. They hold heat most effectively as outdoor cooking stones.
 
Let the stone begin to cool before you soak it and use hot pads to move the stone to avoid burns.
 
Stay away from sedimentary rocks such as shale and slate. Trapped water within the stones can cause them to explode when heated. Avoid marble and limestone. The carbon materials within them can chemically react with some food elements such as citrus juice, wine, tomato sauce and certain salts.
 
Stay away from sedimentary rocks such as shale and slate. Trapped water within the stones can cause them to explode when heated.
 
Avoid marble and limestone. The carbon materials within them can chemically react with some food elements such as citrus juice, wine, tomato sauce and certain salts.

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