How to Make a Rod Holder

How to Make a Rod Holder
Rod holders come in many different styles. A shore-fishing rod holder is simple and inexpensive to make if you own or can borrow a 110-volt gasless MIG welder. You can make a dozen rod holders in about two hours. They make great gifts for fishing buddies. You can even use these rod holders to hold banners or tent poles.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderate

Things You’ll Need:
  • 18 inches of 2-inch-by-1/8-inch angle iron per holder 2 3-inch-by1/4-inch welded steel rings per holder 110-volt gasless MIG welder Welding helmet and full leathers Permanent marker Ruler 4-inch right-angle grinder with cutoff wheel and 24-grit grinding wheel Rust-inhibitive enamel spray paint
  • 18 inches of 2-inch-by-1/8-inch angle iron per holder
  • 2 3-inch-by1/4-inch welded steel rings per holder
  • 110-volt gasless MIG welder
  • Welding helmet and full leathers
  • Permanent marker
  • Ruler
  • 4-inch right-angle grinder with cutoff wheel and 24-grit grinding wheel
  • Rust-inhibitive enamel spray paint
Step 1
Mark one end of the angle iron at approximately a 35-degree angle on both sides with your marker and ruler.
Step 2
Cut the marked angles with your right-angle grinder and cutoff wheel. Deburr with your 24-grit wheel on the right-angle grinder.
Step 3
Weld the first ring approximately two inches from the other end of the angle iron, as depicted in the diagram.
Step 4
Weld the second ring on approximately six inches from the first ring. Use a 24-grit wheel on your right-angle grinder to finish-grind all welds.
Step 5
Paint the entire rod holder using rust-inhibitive spray enamel.

Tips & Warnings

 
Michael Gwyn, who creates custom steel fantasy armor and historical reproduction camping items, uses twisted wrought iron to make his portable holes, which he uses as tent pole holders. According to Daniel Eggertsen, "Rod holders are used when you need or want to use different lures at one time or when you need to fish at different depths."
 
Always wear a welding helmet and full leathers and keep a large, fully charged ABC fire extinguisher within hand's reach when welding.

Article Written By Jane Smith

Jane Smith has provided educational support, served people with multiple challenges, managed up to nine employees and 86 independent contractors at a time, rescued animals, designed and repaired household items and completed a three-year metalworking apprenticeship. Smith's book, "Giving Him the Blues," was published in 2008. Smith received a Bachelor of Science in education from Kent State University in 1995.

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