What Is a Silver Phase Northern Pike?

What Is a Silver Phase Northern Pike?
The silver phase northern pike appears to be a genetic mutation of northern pike, although little is known about these fish. The silver pike is similar to northern pike, but differs in appearance.

Common Names

Silver phase northern pike are commonly called silver pike. Some anglers refer to them as blue pike, but this name can be confusing. Blue walleyes were common in Lake Erie in the early 1900s but are now thought extinct. Many anglers referred to blue walleyes as "blue pike."

Silver Pike Appearance

Silver pike are similar to northern pike, except in coloration and in some body features. Silver pike are silvery-blue and have no spots. They have clear fins and pointed tails. The eyes tend to be proportionately larger and the jaw straighter than northern pike.

Northern Pike Appearance

Northern pike are long, slender fish with a duck-bill mouth filled with sharp teeth. They have white or off-white spots on a green background. Their fins are yellow or red with black stripes and their tails are rounded.

Silver Pike Range

Silver pike are uncommon, but occur wherever northern pike live. Northern pike live in the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. Anglers have documented silver pike in Big Sandy Lake in Saskatchewan, the St. Lawrence River in Ontario, Lac Seul in Ontario, and other places.

Silver Pike Breeding

Silver pike are uncommon, so scientists know little about them. Silver pike were thought to be genetic mutations of northern pike. Scientists now think silver pike will only breed with other silver pike. Laboratory crosses between silver pike and northern pike have produced offspring with coloration that resembles neither parent.

Article Written By Joe Shead

Joe Shead is a freelance writer specializing in outdoor writing. He has written for numerous national and regional outdoor magazines on various topics from hunting to fishing to his pet subject, shed antler hunting.

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