What Are Freeze Dried Foods?

What Are Freeze Dried Foods?
Freeze-dried foods provide an instant meal that is resistant to spoiling. This type of food is typically used in emergency survival situations, or where food storage and preparation is difficult or impossible.
 

Preparation

Food is freeze dried by flash freezing cooked food to a temperature of minus 50 degrees F, leaving taste, nutrients and freshness intact. The processes of sublimation is then implemented by low-level heat in which ice crystals evaporate but allow the food to remain dry and preserved.

 
 

Consumption

Freeze -dried food can easily be consumed right out of the can or pouch. The contents are poured into an eating container where the option of water might be needed for certain foods. Reheating the food is optional.

Types

There are many types of food that can be freeze dried such as vegetables, meats, soups and snacks. Frozen items such as ice cream can also be freeze dried once it goes through the sublimation process.

Uses

Freeze-dried food is popular among campers, backcountry hikers, excursionists and outdoor trips away from civilization. Freeze-dried food can also be used as a stockpile for emergency preparation purposes as the food resists spoiling and varying temperatures.

Storage

Most cans and pouches are lightweight because of lack of water content so they can be stored almost anywhere. Many cans can last up to 25 years, and pouches of freeze-dried foods can withstand approximately seven years of shelf life.

 

Article Written By Julie Boehlke

Julie Boehlke is a seasoned copywriter and content creator based in the Great Lakes state. She is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists. Boehlke has more than 10 years of professional writing experience on topics such as health and wellness, green living, gardening, genealogy, finances, relationships, world travel, golf, outdoors and interior decorating. She has also worked in geriatrics and hospice care.

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