Best Climbs Rocky Mountain National Park  by Stewart M. Green

Best Climbs Rocky Mountain National Park Guide Book

by Stewart M. Green (Falcon Guides)
Best Climbs Rocky Mountain National Park  by Stewart M. Green
Ideal for both local and visiting climbers who want to hit as many select climbs as possible in a weekend or a short visit, Best Climbs Rocky Mountain National Park provides accurate, to-the-point route descriptions complemented by color maps and detailed topos. Longtime Colorado climber Stewart Green filters out more than 100 first-rate routes, from the popular Keyhole Route on Longs Peak to Jurassic Park, a jumble of granite fins perched high on a mountainside. Also included are entertaining sidebars on local climbing history and trivia.

© 2011 Stewart M Green/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Best Climbs Rocky Mountain National Park" Guide Book
Displaying trails 8 of 8.

Displaying trails 1 to 8 of 8.

Combat Rock, a south-facing 250-foot-high cliff, perches on the north side of Bobcat Gulch, a steep canyon that drops south to the narrow valley of the North Fork of the Big Thompson River between Loveland and Estes Park. The crag, a shield composed of hard granite, yields excellent climbs that edge up steep slabs, jam discontinuous crack systems, and swing over blocky roofs. The easily accessible cliff, approached by a short trail, is sunny and sheltered, making it an ideal outing in autumn or spring.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing
The steep northeast face of 12,713-foot-high Hallett Peak towers west of Bear Lake, forming one of Rocky Mountain National Park’s most beautiful mountain vistas. The face’s three buttresses, composed of metamorphic schist and gneiss and chiseled by the Tyndall Glacier, offer excellent multi-pitch alpine climbing adventures. Hallett Peak’s best climbing is found on the 900-foot-high Second Buttress in the middle. The dark cleft of Hallett Chimney separates it from the First Buttress on the left, while the Third Buttress is to its right. The Second Buttress offers excellent climbing on mostly clean rock split by thin cracks and corners and rippled with fingerfriendly edges. The routes are long and sometimes runout on the easier sections. Successful ascents require an early start to avoid thunderstorms, good route-finding skills, and the ability to find gear placements.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing - Trail Length: 5.4
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Jurassic Park, a jumble of granite fins, slabs, and faces, perches high on a mountainside above Lily Lake, south of Estes Park. A varied selection of singlepitch, bolted sport routes ascend the compact area’s half-dozen cliffs. Besides offering fun climbing, Jurassic Park also boasts some of the best climbing views in the Rocky Mountain National Park area, with stunning vistas of Longs Peak to the south.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing
Longs Peak, Colorado’s fifteenth highest mountain at 14,259 feet high, lords over Rocky Mountain National Park as its highest and most famous peak. Longs Peak dominates the park as well as the northern Front Range, its sharp visage visible from the rolling prairie and downtown Denver.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing - Trail Length: 13.2
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Lumpy Ridge, lying in the northeastern sector of Rocky Mountain National Park and north of Estes Park, offers a sunny climbing playground with over thirty-five named crags on its 3-mile-long south-facing ridge. Its scattered lumps of granite form the park’s most popular climbing area, providing a huge variety of great climbs on perfect stone. Most routes are climbed in a traditional style, requiring the placement and removal of gear. A few bolted climbs arefound, but are the exception.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing
MacGregor Slab is an impressive 600-foot-high granite shield pasted on the southwest slopes of Mac-Gregor Mountain, northwest of Estes Park. The southwest-facing slab, looming above the Fall River Entrance to Rocky Mountain National Park, offers a great selection of moderate multipitch routes up cracks, corners, and slabs. The slab’s center has the hardest climbs, tricky enough to challenge most climbers, while the right and left sides present fairly easy routes.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing
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Loch Vale, one of Rocky Mountain National Park’s most scenic spots, descends northeast from the Continental Divide, dropping past alpine tarns and dense evergreen forests. Icy Brook, originating from Taylor Glacier, traverses the valley floor, tumbling over cliffs and twisting through meadows. The upper valley is lined on the north by the Cathedral Spires, a collection of rocky summits and faces including Cathedral Wall and farther west, a bunch of spires—Sharkstooth, Petit Grepon, The Saber, and The Foil. The Petit Grepon is the most beautiful of these spires. This amazing semidetached pinnacle, flanked by Sharkstooth and The Saber, offers an 800-foot-high South Face that culminates with an airy postage-stamp summit, a flat rectangle 10 feet wideand 25 feet long.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing - Trail Length: 9.95
Spearhead perches above Glacier Gorge, an alpine basin flanked by ridges and cliffs, carpeted with meadows and forests, and dotted with lakes. The Spearhead lifts its pointed 12,575-foot-high summit above an 800-foot-high northeast face. This granite wall, dwarfed by surrounding peaks, is climber friendly, seamed with vertical cracks and dihedrals, and covered with incut handholds and flakes. Numerous great climbs up to nine pitches long ascend the concave wall, offering superb climbing in a remote setting.
Estes Park, CO - Climbing - Trail Length: 10.1
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