Fly Fishing Colorado  by Jackson Streit

Fly Fishing Colorado Guide Book

by Jackson Streit (No Nonsense Fly Fishing Guidebooks)
Fly Fishing Colorado  by Jackson Streit
This guide gives you a quick, clear understanding of the essential information you'll need to fly fish Colorado's most outstanding waters. You will not waste time. In a few moments, you will know where to go and how to fly fish. Take this guide along for ready reference, or use this book to plan your Colorado fly fishing trip. Either way, you'll have enough information and your fly fishing experience will be new, fresh and fun.

© 2004 Jackson Streit/No Nonsense Fly Fishing Guidebooks. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Fly Fishing Colorado" Guide Book
Displaying trails 20 of 27.

Displaying trails 1 to 20 of 27.

The Animas River is large by southwest Colorado standards (100 feet wide in some places) and there is no dam interrupting its flow from Silverton to Farmington, New Mexico. The narrow gauge Durango and Silverton Railroad runs through the scenic canyons and along the upper river from June to August. (Make reservations six weeks in advance.) Types of Fish: Brown, rainbow and a few cutthroat and brookies. Fish 18–20 inches are taken. This guide covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Durango, CO - Fly-Fishing
The “Ark” is a relatively under-fished river, known for a prolific May to June Caddis hatch. Many other hatches combine to make this a true western “big water” fly fishing experience. The mountain section flows 150 miles from the old mining town of Climax through central Colorado to the Pueblo Reservoir. From 12,000-foot elevation at the Continental Divide, it drops to 4,700 feet in the eastern plains. There are hundreds of year-round fly fishing opportunities, especially below Lake Creek and from Salida to Pueblo. The recent acquisition of the Hayden Ranch Recreation Area adds another 5.8 miles of public water access to the Arkansas. Located just south of Leadville, Hayden Ranch is quickly becoming a favorite of the knowledgeable angler. Types of Fish: Predominantly reproducing brown trout with some rainbow and cutthroat that average 11–14 inches. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Nathrop, CO - Fly-Fishing
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From high in Rocky Mountain National Park in north central Colorado, the Big Thompson flows east through a canyon to the town of Loveland and eventually into the plains, where it meets the South Platte near Greeley. Starting small, the Big Thompson becomes a medium-sized meadow river after it leaves the heavily fished Lake Estes (in the town of Estes Park) and Big Thompson Canyon. The river is subject to low flows and ice during the winter months, which makes fishing tough or sometimes impossible. There’s some fantastic dry fly fishing, however, starting in spring and continuing to early fall Types of Fish: Stocked rainbow, cutthroat, and wild brown trout. There are also naturally reproducing browns and rainbows. Fish average 6-14 inches.This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Estes Park, CO - Fly-Fishing
The Blue is a medium-size river, running 100-300 cfs most years, and one of the most scenic Gold Medal fisheries in Colorado. Fly fish from Dillon Reservoir dam down to the Colorado River. From Dillon to Green Mountain Reservoir offers the best chance for success. Much of the other water is private, so most anglers use the ten miles of public access between the two lakes. Types of Fish: Brown, rainbow, some brook trout, cutthroats and fall spawning Kokanee salmon. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Silverthorne, CO - Fly-Fishing
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The Poudre is one of the larger freestone rivers draining out of the Rockies onto the plains of northern Colorado. It is also one of the last remaining rivers along the Front Range without a dam or reservoir. It offers a variety of water types and has an excellent insect population that provides prolific hatches. Types of Fish: Rainbow, brown, and some cutthroat. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Fort Collins, CO - Fly-Fishing - Trail Length:
The trout in this section of the Colorado receive relatively light pressure, especially considering the fine fly fishing opportunities available. Floating is really the best way to cover this water, which may, in part, account for the relatively low numbers of fly fishers. Types of Fish: Rainbow and brown trout, Colorado River cutbows, whitefish, some brookies and cutthroats. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Glenwood Springs, CO - Fly-Fishing
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Below the town of Kremmling the Colorado cuts through the spectacular Gore Canyon, dropping dramatically some fifty river miles until it meets the Eagle River at Dotsero. It is best to float the lower end of Gore Canyon, as there are seven good drift sections from Pumphouse to Dotsero. This is not easy water to negotiate. I recommend you get a qualified guide if you want to drift the canyon. Types of Fish: Brown and rainbow trout, Colorado River cutbows and whitefish. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Kremmling, CO - Fly-Fishing
This section is not as big and mighty as stretches farther downstream and one can wade across the river in most areas. This section probably fishes better than the others and there are plenty of State Wildlife Area (SWA) access and parking. In all, a great example of a large and long western-type fly fishing stream. Types of Fish: Rainbow and brown trout, Colorado River cutbows, a few brookies and cutthroats. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Parshall, CO - Fly-Fishing
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In August 1973, longtime friend Chris Owen and I were on the loose and on a two-week excursion to fly fish as many Colorado rivers as possible. Once we fished the Conejos, it was hard to try others. The river just would not let us leave. I still recall fondly those early, uncrowded years on the Conejos. I urge anyone passing through the southern part of Colorado to stay in the pine-covered mountains for a few days and fall in love with the beautiful canyon setting and river. This gem of a trout stream may not yield the numbers and large-sized fish of years gone by, but considering the scenery and over sixty miles of fishable water, it’s well worth a fly fishing trip. Plus, recent habitat improvements and designation of many sections as Wild Trout Waters have improved the fishery. One can wade most of the river, which averages about sixty feet wide, and there are miles and miles of public access. Types of Fish: Brown, rainbow and cutthroat trout, brookies and some northern pike. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Antonito, CO - Fly-Fishing
Head to the north central section of the state to the area known as North Park for some great Gold Medal lake fly fishing. About ten miles west of the town of Walden you’ll find a group of lakes called Delaney Butte Lakes State Wildlife Area. The surroundings, at 8–10,000 foot elevation, are stark. These lakes are anything but barren when it comes to food for trout, however. Food sources include scuds, damsels, large sedges, Callibaetis and some forage fish. Types of Fish: Brown trout. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Walden, CO - Fly-Fishing
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Anglers say they leave a part of themselves on the river every time they experience the out-of-the-way Dolores. Located in the far southwest corner of the state, this is one of Colorado’s best fisheries, with horseshoe bends and a canyon section that is truly unique. Types of Fish: Rainbow, brown and cutthroat trout. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Pleasant View, CO - Fly-Fishing
The Eagle is a beautiful river (especially in the fall) that many locals are proud to call their home water. The wild trout are colorful and strong, averaging fifteen inches with many in the 18-21 inch range. For many years, the Eagle has been overshadowed by the Colorado, Roaring Fork and Fryingpan rivers. As a result, one is often fly fishing alone here—a goal of many. If there’s a meat-and-potatoes kind of trout stream in Colorado, it’s the Eagle, and for many reasons. Much of the seventy-plus-mile river is open to public fishing. One can wade the Eagle during much of its prime season. It contains all the classic types of challenging fly fishing water. The hatches are many, varied and predictable, and Eagle River trout, while not terribly selective, are not pushovers. Types of Fish: Reproducing rainbow and brown with brook and cutthroat in the higher reaches. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Wolcott, CO - Fly-Fishing
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The Fryingpan River is among the best known and loved trout streams in the nation. It is a must for anyone fly fishing in Colorado. The river is managed to maximize recreation and to grow large, wild trout. Types of Fish: Brook, brown, cutthroat and rainbow, with browns and rainbows most common. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Basalt, CO - Fly-Fishing - Trail Length:
Grand Mesa, as this huge flat-top mountain area is called, rises to over 10,000 feet in elevation and is covered with forest and meadows and has over 200 lakes, creeks and streams. This area has long been a favorite for backpackers, campers and anglers. If you’re looking to wet a fly line in a dense grouping of various types of waters amid beautiful scenery at high elevation, then Grand Mesa is your spot. But do come prepared for mosquitoes. Fishing pressure can be heavy on the easily reached lakes and creeks, but for those willing to stray off the beaten track, fly fishing can be excellent. The Colorado Division of Wildlife stocks most of the lakes, but many also hold wild trout populations. Wildlife such as deer, bear and elk are abundant and the terrain varies from semi-arid desert in the lowlands to lush pine and fir forest, aspen groves, meadows, bogs and rocky outcroppings on the mesa. Fly fishing and a visit to this unique and often forgotten part of the great Colorado outdoors can be outstanding. Types of Fish: Rainbow, cutthroat and brown trout, brookies and splake (brookie/lake trout cross). This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Delta, CO - Fly-Fishing
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Awesome. Spectacular. Fantastic. These are just a few of the adjectives that describe this section of the Gunnison, where fly fishing is as good as the scenery. These fifty-three miles are famous for leaping rainbows, stonefly hatches, and very difficult access. Below Blue Mesa Reservoir where the Black Canyon begins, two dams create some great tailwater-type fly fishing. One has to get there by foot, and some places on the trail have a drop of almost 3,000 feet. Be careful hiking in, contact local authorities, be in good physical condition, and plan ahead. Better yet (and highly recommended), contact one of the better outfitters who float the lower section of the canyon. They know the area, and the descent is much easier in this section. Don’t consider floating this dangerous canyon without full knowledge of the river. Enough said. The most spectacular stretch of water, for fly fishing and scenery, runs through the Black Canyon National Park area. Types of Fish: Rainbow, brown, and cutbows. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Montrose, CO - Fly-Fishing
The North Platte runs through a vast, grassy basin called North Park. Not surprisingly, this area is similar to South Park, some 150 miles to the southeast, if you need a point of comparison. The water is a meandering, oxbow meadow-type river and is one of the few rivers that flows north and out of Colorado. The North Platte and tributaries start high and clear in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness. The North Fork of the North Platte also feeds into the North Platte and is a fine fly fishing stream. Both rivers offer many and varied fishing opportunities, as in the South Park area. There are deep pools, riffles and flat water. All fly fishing techniques will take fish on this river. Types of Fish: Brown and rainbow trout.
Cowdrey, CO - Fly-Fishing
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The Piedra (stone in Spanish) is located about as far south in Colorado as one can go. It flows south out of the San Juan Mountains and joins the San Juan River to form Navajo Lake. It offers some forty miles of exceptionally beautiful wild trout fly fishing with lots of pools, riffles and slow-moving sections. Portions of this thirty-foot-wide freestone stream have been considered for designation and protection as a Wild and Scenic River. Types of Fish: Brown and rainbow trout, some exceptionally large. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Chimney Rock, CO - Fly-Fishing
The Rio Grande (The Big River) and its many tributaries offer a wide range of fishing opportunities, from small creek fishing to the challenge of a larger freestone river. There’s an abundance of aquatic insect life in this fine trout fishery, including several species of Mayflies and Caddis and fine populations of Stoneflies. Type of Fish: Above Rio Grande Reservoir rainbow, brown, cutthroat and brook trout. Below Rio Grande Reservoir brown trout with some rainbows. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Creede, CO - Fly-Fishing
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The Roaring Fork may be the best relatively unknown river in the nation. From alpine origins high on the slopes near Independence Pass to the confluence with the mighty Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, the Fork is a study in delightful contrasts. Sixty river miles change from meandering high meadow stream to full-sized, brawling western freestone river suitable for McKenzie River drift boats (watch for rocks!). It also varies from small pocketwater to large runs and pools that may require hours to cover properly. The Fork is also among the finest winter fisheries in Colorado. Many visit the area to combine skiing at nearby Aspen with fly fishing. The Roaring Fork has not achieved the status and ranking it deserves. Perhaps attention goes to its world-famous neighbor, the Fryingpan. In any event, the Fork, with forty miles of Gold Medal Water, holds trout, some up to eight pounds, throughout its entire length. Types of Fish: Primarily rainbow, brown and whitefish. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Carbondale, CO - Fly-Fishing
This free flowing river runs west-southwest from headwaters above Telluride high in the San Juan Mountains. It is the largest tributary of the Dolores River. Set in a narrow, steep red rock canyon, the river gradient drops about fifty feet per mile. This makes for some challenging wading. There are fifty miles of good fly fishing water, including the South Fork, that are in mostly natural and undeveloped settings. Over 90 percent of the river and its major feeder creeks are accessible and public water. Types of Fish: Brook trout in the upper river and creeks and, in the main section, some reproducing cutthroat, and brown, rainbow and hybrid cutbows. There are also stocked fingerling browns and rainbows. This eTrail covers the "where, when, and how" to fish in this region. You'll get a full-page map and information on the known hatches, suggested equipment to bring, and the best flies to use.
Placerville, CO - Fly-Fishing
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