Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition  by Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset

Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition Guide Book

by Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset (Falcon Guides)
Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition  by Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset
Fully updated and revised, Hiking Mount Rainier is a comprehensive and concise guide to the well-maintained trails nestled between the two major metropolises of the Pacific Northwest. Included are sixty hike descriptions for hikers of all ages and skill levels.

© 2018 Heidi Radlinski and Mary Skjelset/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Hiking Mount Rainier National Park - 4th Edition" Guide Book
Displaying trails 20 of 63.

Displaying trails 1 to 20 of 63.

This short hike travels steeply through beautiful meadows overlooking the Paradise area. Parking at the Paradise Complex can be hard to find. A flashing sign when you enter the park indicates whether the parking lots at Paradise are full, a common scenario in the high season. This hike is excellent for children able to troop up a decent hill. It is short and scenic and gives you a little taste of Mount Rainier National Park. If you take this hike in July or August, an abundance of wildflowers will line the trails. Please preserve the fragile meadows where the flowers grow by staying on the trail. Expect to see a lot of people on this popular trail.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 1.6
A spectacular mountain meadow brimming with wildflowers and clear streams awaits hikers willing to climb their way back to Sunrise. To begin this hike, go to the northwestern part of the parking lot; walk up the paved path to the right (east) of the restrooms until you see a dirt trail on your right heading north. After less than 0.1 mile, a map and display on the right delineate some of the trails in the Sunrise area. This point serves as the trailhead for the network of trails in the area. If Berkeley Camp, 3.9 miles into the hike, is your destination, continue to descend beyond the meadow and into a forested area. The camp rests right next to the trail. Day hikers can filter water from Lodi Creek before beginning the 1,300-foot ascent back to the top of Sourdough Ridge.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 7.8
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This very short loop crosses a bridge over a deep, narrow gorge carved by the erosive action of a silt-laden river. This hike is great for those interested in glaciers and glacial rivers. The Box Canyon Trail showcases the powerful polishing force of a glacier and the effects of long-term erosion by its silt-filled water. The paved trail takes you past wildflowers and the thundering canyon itself. For the first half of this hike, the paved trail is wide, smooth, and wheelchair accessible. The entire hike is paved, but the second stretch is considerably rougher and would prove tumultuous travel for a wheelchair.
Ashford, WA - Hiking,Walking - Trail Length: 0.3
Make a gentle, but at times icy and technical, ascent from the Sunrise Complex to the top of a long mountain with the tundra-like terrain of alpine areas and surreal, top-of-the-world views of Mount Rainier’s northeastern flank. While you are walking along this trail, you can see the Cascades to your right; on really clear days you can even see Mount Baker. Mount Rainier also looks magnificent from Sourdough Ridge. As you crest First Burroughs Mountain, Mount Rainier comes into view in its full glory. Take the time to identify the major glaciers and landforms in front of you: Emmons Glacier, Winthrop Glacier, Inter Glacier, and Little Tahoma Peak.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 6.2
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A long, steep trek through an alpine snowfield up to Camp Muir, the most popular base camp for summiting Mount Rainier, this hike affords seasoned hikers exposure to alpine trekking and panoramic views of Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and the Tatoosh Range. Camp Muir is best left for experienced hikers in excellent shape. Without requiring the technical expertise and gear of a full summit, the climb to base camp affords the spoils of high alpine climbs: views of other regal cascades, Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens, a panorama of the jagged Tatoosh Range, and an up-close look at the glaciers and ridges traversed by climbers on their way to the summit. This hike reaches an elevation of 10,080 feet, which feels like the top of the world.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 8.6
A moderate ascent to the foot of the Carbon Glacier, the lowest-elevation glacier in the contiguous United States, this hike travels along the glacier, allowing you to witness many of the geological processes associated with glaciers. Among other things, you will see the rock debris that has been shattered from the rock walls surrounding the glacier and deposited atop the massive river of ice, coloring the glacier brown and black. From the Carbon River trailhead, walk or bike 5.0 miles east along the Carbon River Road, bypassing the Old Mine Trail at 1.2 miles and the Green Lake and Ranger Falls Trail at 3.0 miles, until you reach the Ipsut Creek Campground. Formerly a car campground, Ipsut Creek has vast facilities for a wilderness camp, including many tent sites, bear lockers, and outhouses. You may choose to set up camp here and approach Carbon Glacier as a day hike.
Wilkeson, WA - Backpacking,Hiking - Trail Length: 17.6
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An early opener, this portion of the Wonderland Trail crosses the expansive Nisqually River basin and skirts the Paradise River on its mild ascent to a treed-in vista of Carter and, with a little more effort, the better view of Madcap Falls just up the trail. The Carter Falls Trail is particularly popular in early summer, when the snow in Paradise has not yet melted and trail choices are limited. Carter Falls may seem an unlikely destination for many hikers, as its jetting waters are hardly visible through the trees, but the hike has many other qualities to offer: a massive glacier river basin, an unobstructed view of Mount Rainier on a clear day, a relatively easy grade, and early accessibility.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 2.5
Once a 30-minute exploration of the pebbly Carbon River bed and the cascading slopes of Chenuis Falls on its far bank, the trek to Chenuis Falls now involves a 7.0-mile round-trip trek—by foot or bike—along the closed Carbon River Road to reach the trailhead. From the Carbon River trailhead, head east along the old Carbon River Road, bypassing the Old Mine and Green Lake trailheads on your right (south). Enjoy the towering Douglas firs and thickets of devil’s club while you bear witness to the power of glacial floods. Parts of the road, though easily passable, are unrecognizable as road due to the 2006 washouts. After 3.5 miles you come to a sign for the Chenuis Falls Trail on your left (north).
Wilkeson, WA - Hiking,Mountain Biking - Trail Length: 7.4
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This hike takes you by Comet Falls and up to Van Trump Park, a series of beautiful flower-filled meadows with great views of the Tatoosh Range, Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Rainier. Van Trump Park also offers you ample viewing of Kautz and Van Trump Glaciers. The trail takes you through beautiful forest to several waterfalls, including Comet Falls, one of the tallest falls in the park. From the flower-filled meadows of Van Trump Park, you can view both the Tatoosh Range and Mount Rainier on a clear day.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 5.8
A steep climb to two beautiful mountain lakes tucked away in meadows abounding with glacier lilies beneath an impressive ridge. This steep hike climbs through serene forest into flower-filled meadows, ending at two lovely mountain lakes. Elk are often seen grazing around the lakes, and mountain goats gambol along the ridges lining Upper Crystal Lake. This is a very popular hike, so plan on seeing a lot of fellow hikers. When you reach Upper Crystal Lake, take the time to walk around the lake. Don’t be surprised if a snowbank or two lies in the way. Glacier lilies are often seen in midsummer along the shores, and Sourdough Gap towers above the lake. After snowmelt, hundreds of tadpoles hatch and wiggle in the surrounding ponds.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 6
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The Crystal Peak Trail is a thigh-burning ascent through forest and huckleberry fields to a 360-degree view that includes five volcanoes. For years the trail to Crystal Peak was unmaintained by the National Park Service (though it always had a following), and maps favored the Crystal Lakes Trail. While not officially maintained, the trail to the peak remained easy to follow due to the continued foot traffic. By 2011, NPS was including the trail in a map for Crystal Lakes Trail, as well as a trail description. It is no wonder that hikers refused to let go of the trek to Crystal Peak. The trail may be steep and the climb strenuous, but the top offers a 360-degree panoramic view, including five volcanoes: Mounts Baker, Adams, St. Helens, Hood, and Rainier. Begin the hike heading east along the Crystal Lakes Trail. The first 1.1 miles switchback steadily in the forest as you climb more than 1,000 feet before reaching the Crystal Peak trail junction.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 7.6
This short spur trail connects with the Skyline Trail and has great views of the Tatoosh Range, Mount Rainier, and the Nisqually Glacier. Parking at the Paradise Complex can get hectic. A flashing sign when you enter the park indicates whether the parking lots at Paradise are full, a common scenario on weekends from late morning until early evening. If you want to hike the Skyline Trail but would prefer a shorter, more gradual ascent, consider the Deadhorse Creek Trail as an alternative. In August, wildflowers including lupine and Lewis’s monkeyflower line your path. Please preserve these flowers by staying on designated trails.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 2.2
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A short climb to the top of Dege Peak affords views of Mount Rainier, the North Cascades, Mount Adams, Mount Baker, and Sunrise Lake. Although this hike is only 2.8 miles long, you climb uphill for the entire 1.4-mile trip to Dege Peak. Make sure to bring plenty of water, and pace yourself throughout the climb. From the top of Dege Peak, jaw-dropping scenery surrounds you in every direction. The Sourdough Ridge Trail begins from the west end of the parking lot; head west. Subalpine wildflowers, such as lupine and magenta paintbrush, often line the trail in midsummer, and trees provide much-needed shade on a hot day.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 2.8
This hike is a constant and strenuous ascent through varied terrain, ending with a spectacular view in the saddle between two peaks and offers a spectacular view of the south face of Mount Rainier. For the first 2.0 miles, the trail makes a moderate to steep ascent by means of long switchbacks through lush forest. On the north end of most of the switchbacks, you can catch an obscured glimpse of an unnamed tributary of the Nisqually River. A full view of this tributary will come 2.1 miles into the hike as you cross the wooden bridge just past the halfway point.
Ashford, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 7.2
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Befittingly, Emerald Ridge boasts deep-green meadows, yet this precious gem also houses subalpine wildflowers and hoary marmots. The ridge offers spectacular views of Tahoma Glacier, South Tahoma Glacier, and Glacier Island. Although bikes are not allowed on the park’s backcountry trails, the closed portion of Westside Road has become a popular bike route. You may opt to bicycle from the road closure to the Round Pass trailhead. The park has installed bike racks at the Lake George trailhead, located just before the Round Pass trailhead on the left (west) side of the road, for your convenience.
Ashford, WA - Backpacking,Hiking,Mountain Biking - Trail Length: 15
A short hike up to the Emmons Moraine provides an excellent view of the Emmons Glacier, the largest glacier in the contiguous United States. This short, gradual uphill hike is great for older children and adults looking for a close-up view of the largest glacier in the contiguous forty-eight states. Hike along the Emmons Moraine for an unobstructed view of the Emmons Glacier and its basin, an expansive section of the earth carved out by the glacier in years past. Head west along the Glacier Basin Trail. Very near the beginning of the trail, you come to a billboard with information about old copper mines in the alpine area above the moraine.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 2.8
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A short descent over rocky alpine terrain travels through subalpine meadows to a quaint mountain lake. If you want to escape the crowd at Sunrise and experience a variety of different ecosystems, this is the hike for you. From the tundra on the north side of Sourdough Ridge to the deciduous forest that surrounds Forest Lake, you will have a taste of everything. While you are walking along this trail, you can see the Cascades to the north, and Mount Rainier looks magnificent from here. Soon the Huckleberry Creek Trail splits off to the right (northwest). Take the Huckleberry Creek Trail, 0.6 mile into your hike. The trail briefly ascends and then begins a long descent to Forest Lake.
Greenwater, WA - Hiking - Trail Length: 5
A moderate ascent skirts the Emmons Glacier Moraine to a camp at the foot of the Inter Glacier, the icy path crossed by climbers summiting Mount Rainier from Camp Schurman. Head west along the Glacier Basin Trail. Very near the beginning of the trail, you come to a billboard with information about old copper mines in the alpine area above the moraine, which never produced much in the way of precious metals but left a nicely graded road to hike. The hike begins in shaded forest, continues straight, and turns into switchbacks, which offer peeks at an unnamed waterfall at their east end. After less than 1.0 mile, you reach the junction with the Emmons Moraine Trail.
Greenwater, WA - Backpacking,Hiking - Trail Length: 7
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The hike to Gobbler’s Knob passes the clear waters of Lake George and ascends to a peak with panoramic views of Mount St. Helens, the Goat Rocks, the North Cascades, the Olympics, Mount Hood, and Mount Rainier. Lake George, a beautiful mountain lake, is one of the few places to fish in Mount Rainier National Park. Although bikes are not allowed on the park’s backcountry trails, the closed portion of Westside Road has become a popular bike route. You may opt to bicycle from the road closure to the Round Pass trailhead. The park has installed bike racks at the Lake George trailhead, located just before the Round Pass trailhead on the left (west) side of the road, for your convenience. Consider experiencing a taste of the Glacier View Wilderness by taking a side trip to Goat Lake, adding only 3.8 miles to your hike. At Goat Lake you can enjoy the tranquility of the lake or take your chances fishing from the banks.
Ashford, WA - Backpacking,Hiking,Mountain Biking - Trail Length: 12
A mild descent to a lovely mountain meadow brimming with wildflowers and clear streams becomes a relatively flat hike to a massive expanse of subalpine park atop a plateau. If you come to Sunrise at just the right moment—when the snow has melted in the parks below Sourdough Ridge but Berkeley Park has not quite burst into bloom—chances are that Grand Park will host a meadow of wildflowers as far as the eye can see. If you find yourself in this situation and can muster the energy for a long day hike, do not miss out on this opportunity. The hike starts from Sunrise, climbs to the top of Sourdough Ridge, weaves through Berkeley Park, and trundles over a ridge to the breathtaking expanse of Grand Park.
Greenwater, WA - Backpacking,Hiking - Trail Length: 12.2
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