Walking Portland, Oregon  by Sybilla Avery Cook

Walking Portland, Oregon Guide Book

by Sybilla Avery Cook (Falcon Guides)
Walking Portland, Oregon  by Sybilla Avery Cook
This compact guidebook will walk you through the best Portland has to offer. It includes step-by-step descriptions and detailed maps of 22 excursions--from half-mile strolls to more rigorous four mile jaunts. It will lead you along the Willamette River, through the elegant downtown and well-preserved older neighborhoods, and along the trails of popular city parks.

© 2013 Sybilla Avery Cook/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Walking Portland, Oregon" Guide Book
Displaying trails 20 of 22.

Displaying trails 1 to 20 of 22.

The Portland Audubon Society operates Audubon House, an interpretive center with exhibits of birds and wildlife. They also run a wildlife rehabilitation center specializing in birds. The excellent nature store features gifts, books, and aids for identifying the birds, wildlife, and plants you may see along the trail. A trail map shows three loop walks that begin at the store. The society offers many different birding events, nature classes, and guided tours, so call for information on times and dates.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 1
Beverly Cleary has been writing award-winning children’s books since the 1950s. Cleary used the Hollywood neighborhood, where she grew up, as the setting for her books about Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, and Otis Spofford. The neighborhood has not changed much. You will walk by Cleary’s childhood homes and see some of the schools, parks, and other places that are named in her books. Cleary also set a few scenes in the Laurelhurst neighborhood, which is directly to the south on the other side of the freeway.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 7
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This walk begins at Portland’s Pioneer Court- house Square, center of today’s downtown Portland, and easily reached on foot from most downtown hotels. This square has long been the center of the city—first, as the site of the city’s first school, and later, the elegant Portland Hotel. The square now serves as a city plaza, transportation hub, and venue for a variety of popular outdoor events. Its backers hoped for the square to be “distinctive, dynamic, elegant, inviting, and unique to the area.” Architect Willard Martin’s design managed all of that, and the plaza is still a vibrant city center nearly thirty years after its 1984 opening.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3.25
This busy convention and shopping district is easily reached by car, light-rail, bus, or streetcar.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 4
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This area recently has become a motel and commercial district serving the Portland International Airport. A small pond still remains in the center of the area; it is part of the Columbia River Slough, which the Port of Portland is maintaining as open space, even as development goes on all around it. These sloughs are important watersheds, providing homes to many types of wildlife, as well as a pleasant respite from the commotion of the airport and motels. Begin this walk from any of the motels on Airport Way East. Take the sidewalk on the north side of the road and walk west toward the junction with Glenn Widing Drive. Turn right on the concrete sidewalk.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 1.5
The addition of the Eastbank Esplanade means that a walker can loop Portland’s east and west riverfronts from the Burnside Bridge to the Hawthorne Bridge, with a variety of interesting views. Both sides have displays on waterfront history.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
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This walk through the Eastmoreland area takes you through many different environments. The 18-mile long Springwater Corridor Trail is located on an abandoned railroad line and goes east from here to Gresham and Boring. It provides access to wildlife areas, wetlands, and parks. It also joins the 40-Mile Loop—actually about 140 miles now— intended to circle Portland and link every park in the citypark system. Special attractions: Natural wetlands and creek, a college campus, and gardens surrounding a spring-fed lake. Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden is wheelchair accessible.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 2.5
Early Portland included stump-filled land, good soil, and gulches filled with water runoff from the Tualatin Hills. These attracted a wide variety of workers, immigrants from many lands, and a wealthy merchant class that grew rich along with the city. This walk takes you from the once-depressed commercial area, newly attractive to today’s young entrepreneurs, to a working-class area known for its tannery and Chinese gardens, to the well- kept mansions overlooking the once-busy city. On the way you will also pass by one of Portland’s oldest sports fields, newly renovated into a major league soccer stadium.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
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This paved path takes you through a variety of conifers, with benches and viewpoints along the way to help you enjoy the route.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 0.5
Stroll through the largest assortment of conifers in the world and see various species of redwood, spruce, fir, cedar, and pine. The Hoyt Arboretum features more than 800 labeled species of trees and shrubs spread out over 175 acres. There are 8 miles of trails within the arboretum itself, and some of these connect with other trails in Forest Park. Guided weekend nature walks are offered from April through October.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 2
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Plympton Kelly, an early settler in this neighbor- hood, named this hill “Mount Tabor” after he read about a battle fought by the French against the Muslims near Mount Tabor in Palestine. Not until 1912, many years after the hill was developed into a neighborhood park, was it discovered to be an extinct volcano. The summit is 600 feet above the surrounding area.
Portland, OR - Hiking,Mountain Biking,Trail Running,Walking - Trail Length: 2
The Hotel deLuxe was formerly the Mallory Hotel, a favorite downtown hotel for many years. Its decor is reminiscent of the glory days of Hollywood, but the Driftwood Room is still original. The Alphabet District across Burnside is still referred to as Northwest or Nob Hill by most Portlanders, the “Nob Hill” nickname coming from a grocer who wanted to associate this neighborhood with the well-known San Francisco district. Portland’s affluent built large magnificent houses here, patterned on mansions found on the East Coast, or in Europe. These proved difficult to keep up, and after World War I later owners moved out and into large apartment houses being built nearby. Although a great many mansions were torn down, several remain and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This walk passes some of these originals, as well as many lovingly restored and maintained smaller homes.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 4
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This riverfront area is where Portland originally was founded and developed. Fires destroyed the first wooden buildings, which were replaced by buildings with cast-iron facades. After major downtown flooding in the late 1800s, businesses moved back from the river leaving these buildings behind. Many old structures were demolished. Those remaining are now being renovated, restored, and reused by tempting shops and restaurants. An expressway along the riverbank was torn down to create Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Today this entrance to the city hosts many civic and cultural events. It is always full of walkers, cyclers, runners, dogs, and people just admiring the view.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
The Corbett and Lair Hill walks go through a large collection of historic working-class homes dating from the late 1800s to the early part of the twentieth century. This area, once considered a slum, was saved from urban renewal by residents who were appalled at what had happened to the northern part of the community. But the major highways slicing through it left most roads as dead ends, making it difficult for developers to navigate. Left to itself, it was later rediscovered by a new generation who appreciated the large trees and charming structures of the original small houses. Today these homes are being carefully painted and restored, and every street has interesting examples of architecture.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
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Lair Hill is named not for a hill but for a man, William Lair Hill. This is the west section of the historic South Portland neighborhood. Families coming along the Oregon Trail and single men seeking business opportunities in Portland settled here before the Civil War. Many young men traveled by sea around South America.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
These urban parks are among the most recent additions to the system. The goals of both parks include providing residents of high-density buildings a pleasant outdoor experience, with places for individual quietude, neighborly conversation, and group events. South Waterfront Park is closely tied to the river, while Caruthers Park is near the Oregon Center for Health and Healing office building and serves several surrounding high-rises.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3
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This walk begins at the central plaza of downtown Portland, easily reached on foot from most downtown hotels. This square, scene of countless festivals and outdoor exhibits, is bordered by department stores, specialty shops within reconstructed buildings, excellent restaurants, and one-of-a-kind boutiques. The walk continues through twelve tree-shaded Park Blocks, passing the Multnomah County Library, the Oregon History Center, the Center for the Performing Arts, the Portland Art Museum, and the campus of Portland State University.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3.25
Only five minutes from Portland International Airport, this 62-acre Roman Catholic sanctuary, founded by the Servites, is a peaceful retreat from the bustle of modern life. Take a leisurely stroll through the woodsy plaza level, where vines and shrubs muffle the noise of nearby Sandy Boulevard, and admire the replica of Michelangelo’s Pieta` inside a rock grotto. An elevator lifts you to the top of a 110-foot cliff. At the top, you’ll find incredible views and beautifully manicured gardens. Mr. Butchart, known for the Butchart Gardens on Vancouver Island, donated plants from his gardens and helped with the layout of the grounds.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 1
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This walk begins at the central plaza of downtown Portland, easily reached on foot from most downtown hotels. This square, scene of countless festivals and outdoor exhibits, is bordered by department stores, specialty shops within reconstructed buildings, excellent restaurants, and one-of-a-kind boutiques. The walk passes much of the sidewalk art around the downtown transit malls. You will see art galleries, antiques shops, and interior-decorating stores in the Pearl District, as well as experience Chinatown’s unique ambiance.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 3.5
This 332-acre park offers sweeping panoramic views, play and picnic areas, tennis courts, a zoo, and an amphitheater for outdoor concerts. It is one of Portland’s oldest and best-loved parks. Former German sailor Charles Meyers, the first park keeper, relied on his memories of European parks as he developed what was then called City Park. Former seaman Richard Knight, a Portland pharmacist, had begun purchasing the animals collected by his old shipmates during their travels. When his acquisitions outgrew his exhibition space, he donated the animals to the city for a zoo. Meyers added the role of zookeeper to his duties. He dug the world’s first sunken pit to house the zoo’s bears.
Portland, OR - Walking - Trail Length: 2
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