Hiking Oregon State Hiking Guides Series  by Lizann Dunegan

Hiking Oregon (State Hiking Guides Series) Guide Book

by Lizann Dunegan (Falcon Guides)
Hiking Oregon State Hiking Guides Series  by Lizann Dunegan
Lace up your boots and sample fifty of the finest trails in the Beaver State. From the Pacific shoreline to the Blue Mountains, Oregon offers a remarkable diversity. This one-of-a-kind guidebook will take you on hikes along rugged, rocky coastline to historic lighthouses; through sagebrush high desert and magnificent lava plains; to the tops of volcanic peaks; past cascading waterfalls; and alongside wild and scenic rivers. Explore the spectacular coastal cliffs at Harts Cove, the dramatic Columbia River Gorge at Angels Rest, the lush riparian ecosystem along the Metolius River, and the moonlike volcanic landscape of Little Belknap Crater. Veteran hiker and outdoor writer Lizann Dunegan will introduce you to these trails and more.

© 2013 Lizann Dunegan/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Hiking Oregon (State Hiking Guides Series)" Guide Book
Displaying trails 20 of 55.

Displaying trails 1 to 20 of 55.

This hike through Alfred A. Loeb State Park offers a rare glimpse of two hard-to-find tree species: the Oregon myrtle and the redwood. The Riverview Trail follows the banks of the salmon-and steelhead-rich Chetco River through an old grove of Oregon myrtle trees. The Redwood Nature Trail loops through a grove of immense coast redwood trees. Both trails include numbered markers that correspond to a detailed brochure pointing out all the highlights. The state park also has a campground and all kinds of fun things to see and do. You can swim in the Chetco River, fish, or rent a charter boat in nearby Brookings Harbor. In addition, the park is the gateway to the 179,655-acre Kalmiopsis Wilderness and its hundreds of miles of trails, numerous lakes, and rugged river gorges.
Brookings, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 4.2
The dramatic rock cliffs of Angels Rest, accessible from a well-maintained trail, tower 1,500 feet above the Columbia River Gorge in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. The trail is certain to test your aerobic endurance but includes enough alluring distractions to keep your mind off the elevation gain. As a reward for all your hard work, there is a first-rate view of the Columbia River Gorge from the top. Rising almost 1,500 feet from the Historic Columbia River Highway, the rocky summit of Angels Rest offers stunning views of the Columbia Gorge. The basalt cliffs and ridges visible on this hike are the result of a thirty-million-year struggle between fire and water. The cliffs are the eroded remnants of the Columbia lava flows that poured through the region over millions of years and originated from volcanic eruptions in eastern Oregon and Washington.
Portland, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 4.4
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This easy 2.0-mile out-and-back trail takes you through part of the Babyfoot Lake Botanical Area, home to many rare plant species that are found only in the unspoiled Kalmiopsis Wilderness. After 1 mile of hiking, you reach Babyfoot Lake, which sits in a dramatic glacial cirque surrounded by timbered hillsides that contain a large population of rare Port Orford cedar and Brewer’s spruce trees.
Brookings, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 2
This route follows the southern segment of the Deschutes River Trail. It takes you through a magnificent old-growth ponderosa pine forest along the banks of the moody Deschutes River. Highlights of the route include a spectacular viewpoint of Benham Falls, grand views of South Sister and Broken Top, and opportunities to see osprey and other wildlife. This route starts at the picturesque Benham Falls Day Use picnic area that is set among towering old-growth ponderosa pine trees. The day-use area has picnic tables,fire rings,and rest rooms.You’ll begin the hike by walking on a forested path along the shores of the Deschutes River. The river is very quiet and wide along this section because of a man-made logjam that is present above the wood bridge that crosses the river.
Bend, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 4.6
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This route follows the southern segment of the Deschutes River Trail. It takes you through a magnificent old-growth ponderosa pine forest along the banks of the moody Deschutes River. Highlights of the route include a spectacular viewpoint of Benham Falls, grand views of South Sister and Broken Top, and opportunities to see osprey and other wildlife.
Bend, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 4.6
The Big Obsidian Flow Trail is an easy and convenient way to check out Oregon’s youngest lava flow. Located in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, this fascinating path crosses the lava flow and highlights the volcanic history of the area. Interpretive signs along the way explain how Native Americans visited the area to collect obsidian for making jewelry and tools. One of the main attractions at the 55,000-acre Newberry National Volcanic Monument is the Big Obsidian Flow Trail, which provides a fascinating tour of Oregon’s youngest lava flow. The trail, which begins as a flat, paved path, offers panoramic views of the flow and includes interpretive signs intended to make understanding the landscape easy. The lava rock is very sharp,so be sure to wear sturdy shoes.
Bend, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 0.7
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Black Butte rises 6,436 feet above the central Oregon landscape.This well-known geological landmark, a 1.5-million-year-old stratovolcano, was created by numerous basaltic lava flows over hundreds of years. Because Black Butte stands in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, it has not been exposed to the eroding forces of wind and water like its neighboring peaks and has therefore managed to maintain its conical shape. This trail leads to the top of one of central Oregon’s best-known landmarks, 6,436-foot Black Butte. The summit includes three historic fire lookouts and fantastic views of several Cascade peaks to the west. Interpretive signs en route to the summit point out native plant and tree species.
Sisters, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 3.8
The Black Canyon Trail takes you on a tour of the outback in the Black Canyon Wilderness. The trail follows Black Canyon Creek through a deep, rocky canyon filled with ponderosa pine and Douglas fir and numerous stream crossings. If you hike the trail during the midsummer months, don’t miss the opportunity to feast on the wild red raspberries. If you are up for an adventure and want to get away from it all, backpack the entire 11.6-mile trail (not just the 2.6 miles described below). Set up a shuttle by leaving a car at the Wolf Mountain trailhead.
Dayville, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 5.2
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This trail winds its way through a mountain-hemlock forest to the craggy red-cinder summit of Black Crater. At the prominent summit you can enjoy sweeping views of the snow-topped Three Sisters Mountains, Mount Washington, and the surrounding lava flows and craters that make up the Mount Washington Wilderness. The walk to the top is tough, but the view of the surrounding central Oregon volcanic landscape is well worth the effort. Central Oregon is truly the land of volcanoes, and the Sisters vicinity is, perhaps, its most shining example. One incredible hike is along the Black Crater Trail, which leads to the summit of 7,251-foot Black Crater. The difficult path, which climbs to the craggy, double-pinnacled summit, is a test of both strength and endurance. The trail begins as a series of switchbacks through a mountain-hemlock forest.
Sisters, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 8.4
This hike takes you on the Oregon Coast Trail through the heart of Samuel H. Boardman State Park. You’ll walk through thick Sitka spruce forest, past bubbling coastal creeks, on wild and windy headlands with fantastic views of offshore sea stacks and rocky islands, and on a beautiful secluded beach. The charming coastal town of Brookings lies 6 miles north of the California-Oregon border on the bay of the Chetco River and boasts uncrowded beaches, spectacular bluffs and offshore rock formations, a busy fishing harbor, prize fishing on the Chetco River, and some of the warmest weather on the Oregon Coast. Established in 1908, Brookings is the namesake of the Brookings family, who founded the Brookings Lumber and Box Company. In the past, logging was the chief industry here, but now tourism, Easter lily bulb production (Brookings is the nation’s leader), and sportfishing are also major industries in this bustling seaport.
Brookings, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 9.4
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This ramble through a lush coastal forest of rare old-growth Sitka spruce leads to the end of scenic Cape Lookout in Cape Lookout State Park. Along the way there are magnificent views of Cape Meares to the north and Cape Kiwanda to the south. Gray whales can be seen in December, January, March, and April as they near the cape on their semiannual migrations. The trail can be muddy during the winter and spring months.
Tillamook, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 5
Cape Meares, located in Cape Meares State Park, is one of three scenic capes along the Three Capes Scenic Highway—the other two are Cape Lookout and Cape Kiwanda. A hike here includes numerous opportunities to view seabirds and migrating gray whales. Other attractions include the Cape Meares Lighthouse, which was built in 1890; old-growth Sitka spruce trees; spectacular ocean views; and abundant wildlife and coastal forestland. Plan on spending the better part of a day here—and be sure to bring your binoculars.
Tillamook, OR - Hiking
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Take your pick of ten trails that wind through the 2,700-acre Cape Perpetua Scenic Area. Depending on the trail you select, you can experience a botanical wonderland of coastal forest, rocky tide pools, and other ocean spectacles, such as the geyser-like Spouting Horn and the narrow rock channel of Devil’s Churn. While you’re here, plan on spending a few hours at the Cape Perpetua Interpretive Center. The center provides a good introduction to the plants and animals that live here as well as a look into the area’s rich history.
Yachats, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 10
This trek explores the high country on the east side of Mount Hood. The trail leads to the top of Cooper Spur for great views of the deep crevasses of Eliot Glacier and the snow-covered summits of Mounts Hood, Adams, and Rainier. But don’t worry about climbing any snow routes—the most dangerous part of this trail is the 45-degree snowfield far beyond and high above this hike’s turnaround point.
Hood River, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 7.6
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This trail through the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area leads through a deep, scenic canyon carved by bubbling Eagle Creek and shaded by a canopy of oak, big-leaf maple, and cedar. Along the route, hikers are rewarded with views of half a dozen cascading waterfalls and a creek perfectly suited for a swim during the hot summer months. Backpackers can hike in and camp at any one of four established campsites along the first 7.5 miles of the trail—but keep in mind that these sites fill up fast. For more solitude, forge ahead 13.3 miles from the Eagle Creek trailhead to Wahtum Lake and camp there.
Portland, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 6.8
Ecola State Park Saddle Mountain State Park Cascade Head Scenic Research Area Cape Meares State Park Cape Lookout State Park Silver Falls State Park Forest Park Ainsworth State Park Ainsworth State Park Ainsworth State Park Ainsworth State Park Ainsworth State Park Ainsworth State Park Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Siuslaw National Forest Siuslaw National Forest Siuslaw National Forest Jessie M Honeyman Memorial State Park Sunset Bay State Park Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest Umpqua National Forest Umpqua National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Mt Hood National Forest Williamette National Forest Williamette National Forest Williamette National Forest Williamette National Forest Williamette National Forest Smith Rock State Park Chocobo National Forest Chocobo National Forest John Day Fossil Beds National Monument Malheur National Forest Wallowa National Forest Fremont National Forest State Holding
Cannon Beach, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 3
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Located in scenic Ecola State Park, this classic coastal route offers a winding singletrack trail through a dense coastal forest with awesome ocean views and a picturesque beach for a finale. Ecola State Park covers 1,304 acres and offers breathtaking views from several viewpoints. For a warm-up be sure to head toward the ocean on a short paved trail that leads to expansive viewpoints looking south toward Cannon Beach and Haystack Rock. From this vantage point you may see the spouts of gray whales during their semiannual migration. These amazing marine mammals migrate south during December and January, north during March and April. During Whale Watch Weeks, the last week in December and the last week in March, trained volunteers can help you spot the whales.
Cannon Beach, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 3
If you truly want to experience the beauty and solitude of pristine wilderness, this hike is for you. Old-growth ponderosa, lodgepole, and whitebark pines fill the Gearhart Mountain Wilderness with their stately beauty. This hike also takes you through the Palisades, a unique area of oddly shaped rock formations, and ends at a high pass with magnificent views of Steens Mountain to the east, the Three Sisters Mountains to the west, and California’s Mount Lassen. Backpackers have the option of continuing another 3.4 miles to Blue Lake, a high alpine lake stocked with rainbow trout.
Bly, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 11.2
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This forest trail travels through a western hemlock and old-growth Sitka spruce forest to a dramatic clifftop viewpoint overlooking Harts Cove.From this high perch you can view sea lions offshore and watch magnificent waves crashing into offshore rocks.
Lincoln City, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 5.4
This forest trail travels through a western hemlock and old-growth Sitka spruce forest to a dramatic cliff-top viewpoint overlooking Harts Cove. From this high perch you can view sea lions offshore and watch magnificent waves crashing into offshore rocks. This forest trail begins by descending on a series of switchbacks through a monochrome stand of forty-year-old western hemlock. After 0.7 mile you’ll cross a wood footbridge over picturesque Cliff Creek. The soothing sounds of this bubbling creek mixed with the far off sounds of sea lions and ocean wind blowing through the trees give you a sense of anticipation as you continue your descent toward Harts Cove. After this creek crossing the forest opens up and comes alive with giant 250-year-old Sitka spruce trees at center stage.These rare gentle giants thrive in coastal areas and feature stout trunks with dozens of limbs that shoot outward from the base of the tree.
Lincoln City, OR - Hiking - Trail Length: 5.4
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