Fishing Western New York  by Spider Rybaak

Fishing Western New York Guide Book

by Spider Rybaak (Falcon Guides)
Fishing Western New York  by Spider Rybaak
Western New York is blessed with superb and diverse fisheries. From steelhead in Lake Erie to muskies in the St. Lawrence, brook trout in Allegany State Park to smallmouth bass in the Finger Lakes, there are fishing opportunities to suit every angler. In this guide, the companion volume to Fishing Eastern New York, local angler and author Spider Rybaak shares his encyclopedic knowledge of more than 180 top fishing locales in Western New York. Look inside to find: site descriptions, including species present and the best times to fish tips on techniques, tackle, lures, flies, and baits campgrounds, access, and regulations photos and detailed maps Whether you're planning a quiet evening's fishing or a season's worth of angling expeditions, let Fishing Western New York be your guide.

© 2004 Spider Rybaak/Falcon Guides. All Rights Reserved.

Trails from the "Fishing Western New York" Guide Book
Displaying trails 20 of 187.

Displaying trails 1 to 20 of 187.

Built in 1965 and currently owned by the Newark Valley School System, this 15-acre impoundment is completely surrounded by woods. Averaging 4 feet deep and dropping to a maximum of 15 feet, its floor is littered with tree stumps. Don Alexander, the guy who built the place and for whom it’s named, says he originally stocked it with brook trout. However, largemouth bass and bluegills from a neighboring pond swam in on runoff, ate all the brookies, and seeded Alexander Lake with their own kind. Largemouth bass average 3 pounds, and many larger ones are available. Key species: Largemouth bass and bluegill
Binghamton, NY - Fishing
Set in the Allegheny foothills, this Army Corps of Engineers floodcontrol project on the Allegheny River covers anywhere from 21,180 acres during the spring thaw down to 12,080 acres at summer pool. Roughly 25 percent of it is in New York, and 90 percent of that is on the Seneca Allegany Indian Territory, one of the six tribes in the Iroquois Confederacy. The shoreline is mostly forested. Key species: Walleye, northern pike, muskellunge, smallmouth bass, brown trout, rainbow trout, and channel catfish
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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Rising in Pennsylvania’s Potter County, the Allegheny River comes up to New York as a wide, slow-moving stream averaging 4 feet deep, punctuated with holes up to 12 feet deep. Only running through New York for about 40 miles, totally within Cattaraugus County, it slices through two cities and ends its tour of the state on Seneca Allegany Indian Territory as the Allegheny (Kinzua) Reservoir. In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, it joins the Monongahela River to form the mighty Ohio River. Key species: Muskellunge, northern pike, walleye, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, bluegill, and rock bass
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
Covering 58 acres, averaging 8 feet deep, and dropping to a maximum depth of 19 feet, this man-made lake is located in the northeastern corner of the 2,421-acre Allen Lake State Forest. State fisheries biologist Joe Evans says, “Historically this lake was managed as a trout fishery. That idea was shelved when it was realized the habitat was more suited for warm-water species.” Largemouth bass were stocked in 1995 to control runaway populations of panfish, which grew to such numbers, they were stunted. Still, trout proved very popular and are now stocked on a put-and-take basis. In 2002 the lake got roughly 2,000 brookies and 2,600 rainbows averaging 9 inches. In addition, 180 brookies averaging 15 inches and 120 19.5-inchers were released. Most of these fish are caught early in the season on worms, minnows, and commercial trout baits. The largemouth bass do well, ranging from 12 to 22 inches. They take crankbaits, spinnerbaits, and bass bugs.
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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Formed after the last ice age, when the huge chunk of glacial ice sitting on the site finally melted, this 141-acre body of water is classified a kettle lake. Its average depth is around 7 feet, and its deepest spot drops to 35 feet. Roughly threequarters of the shoreline is wetland. Key species: Muskellunge, northern pike, black bass, yellow perch, walleye, black crappie, bluegill, pumpkinseed, and brown bullhead.
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
An old beaver pond on which someone built a permanent dam, this exceptionally scenic 50-acre impoundment averages 4 feet deep and has a maximum depth of 7 feet. Key species: Largemouth bass, northern pike, bluegill, and brown bullhead
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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Covering over 10,980 acres, Black Lake is the largest in this highly productive group. Roughly 20 miles long, averaging 8 feet deep, dropping to a maximum depth of 29 feet, and punctuated with scenic islands, its warm, clean, weedy water makes it the most fruitful largemouth bass and crappie fishery in the state. Key species: Black bass, walleye, northern pike, muskellunge, black crappie, yellow perch, rock bass, bluegill, bullhead, and channel catfish
Syracuse, NY - Fishing
Five miles long and up to 3 miles wide, this bay is one of the lake’s most productive fisheries. You name the habitat and it’s here: islands, shoals, sprawling weed beds, steep drops, deep holes, and channels. Key species:Walleye, northern pike, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel catfish, burbot, carp, sunfish, bullhead, and American eel
Syracuse, NY - Fishing
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This 240-acre bay averages 14 feet deep and has a maximum depth of 24 feet. Its shoreline is roughly half private residences, half bottomland forest. Key species: Largemouth bass, northern pike, walleye, and panfish
Rochester, NY - Fishing
Fed by Salmon and Buttonwood Creeks, this 250-acre bay boasts an incredible collection of warm-water habitat. Its wide, shallow mouth sports countless old pilings. Inside, the bay offers a menu of weed beds, undercut cattail edges, rock fields, new and abandoned docks, bridge abutments—you name it. Key species: Northern pike, largemouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, sunfish, rock bass, and brown bullhead
Rochester, NY - Fishing
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Averaging 6 feet deep, surrounded by marsh, and smelling like a fresh fish, average folks consider this place a backwater suitable only for ducks and mosquitoes—which is another way of saying it’s a dynamite fishing hole. Key species: Largemouth bass, northern pike, bluegill, black crappie, and yellow perch
Rochester, NY - Fishing
The headwaters of the Buffalo River, this stream twists and turns every chance it gets, meandering for a dizzying 35 miles or so before reaching its destination on the outskirts of Buffalo. Key species: Walleye, smallmouth bass, steelhead, and brown trout
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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Flowing through Buffalo, the state’s second largest city, this Lake Erie tributary got dumped on quite a bit in the past. Indeed, in the 1960s about all that plied its sticky waves were brown nasties—not trout, either. Currently the stuff flowing through it resembles water again, prompting some to proclaim it one of the state’s greatest environmental success stories. Key species: Walleye, smallmouth bass, and steelhead
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
This 1,005-acre body of water is the second largest Indian River lake. It averages 15 feet deep, has a maximum depth of 50 feet, boasts numerous islands, and has a steep, mostly forested shoreline accented in outcrops. Key species: Walleye, northern pike, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie, bluegill, and bullhead
Syracuse, NY - Fishing
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Bubbling to the surface just south of Apulia Station, at the divide separating the Susquehanna and Oswego River drainages, this creek flows north for about 20 miles, fills and drains Jamesville Reservoir, and pours through a gorge before joining Limestone Creek in North Manlius. Key species: Brown trout, brook trout, and carp
Syracuse, NY - Fishing
Covering 649 acres, averaging 50 feet deep, and dropping to a maximum of 95 feet deep, this is the smallest Finger Lake. Its shoreline is undeveloped. Key species: Lake trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, black bass, chain pickerel, and panfish
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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Set in a high valley, this 10,558-acre lake is just short of 16 miles long, averages 125 feet deep, and has a maximum depth of 276 feet. Key species: Lake trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, black bass, yellow perch, and sunfish
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
This warm-water stream flows for about 50 miles, through a gently rolling countryside spotted with farms and woodlots, and feeds the Tioga River about 5 miles southwest of Corning. Key species: Brown trout, smallmouth bass, and walleye
Binghamton, NY - Fishing
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This 80-acre flood-control impoundment averages 10 feet deep and drops to a maximum depth of 32 feet. Key species: Brown trout, rainbow trout, largemouth bass, black crappie, brown bullhead, bluegill, and pumpkinseed
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
The outlet of Cassadaga Lakes, this creek has many faces. Starting out as warm-water habitat, it meanders for a couple miles, picks up a couple tributaries and springs, and cools down to good trout habitat. Several miles later it slows down, flattens out, and warms up into a shallow, riverlike environment, providing 28 miles of challenging warm-water habitat before pouring into Conewango Creek. Averaging 3 feet deep, it has holes that drop to 12 feet. Key species: Brown trout, muskellunge, northern pike, walleye, smallmouth bass, and white sucker
Buffalo, NY - Fishing
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