Niagara Recreation Trail

Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens, Ontario

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Niagara Recreation Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Regional Municipality of Niagara, Ontario. It is within Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens. It is 4.3 miles long and begins at 510 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 37 feet. Near the trailhead there are parkings. Butterfly Conservatory and other parkings, the Floral Clock attraction, and the Sir Adam Beck Power Stations museum can be seen along the trail. There are also trees, a bbq, a picnic site, bicycle parking, a viewpoint, and restrooms along the trail.
Distance: mi Elevation: ft
Niagara Recreation Trail is a hiking and biking trail in Regional Municipality of Niagara, Ontario. It is within Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens. It is 4.3 miles long and begins at 510 feet altitude. Traveling the entire trail is 0.1 miles with a total elevation gain of 37 feet. Near the trailhead there are parkings. Butterfly Conservatory and other parkings, the Floral Clock attraction, and the Sir Adam Beck Power Stations museum can be seen along the trail. There are also trees, a bbq, a picnic site, bicycle parking, a viewpoint, and restrooms along the trail.
Activity Type: Hiking, Mountain Biking, Road Biking, Trail Running, Walking
Nearby City: Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens
Distance: 4.3
Elevation Gain: Minimal
Trailhead Elevation: 510 feet
Top Elevation: 527 feet
Driving Directions: Directions to Niagara Recreation Trail
Parks: Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens
Elevation Min/Max: 500/527 ft
Elevation Start/End: 510/510 ft

Niagara Recreation Trail Professional Review and Guide

"The Niagara Glen was created about 8,000 years ago, when Lake Erie dumped water into Lake Ontario via a waterfall called Wintergreen Falls, which was located at the site of the present-day Niagara Glen. The park consists of a section of dry riverbed called Wintergreen Terrace (also known as the Wintergreen Flats) at the level of the Niagara Parkway, and a jut of land 36m (118ft) below called the Wilson Terrace. The hiking trails are all located on the Wilson Terrace. You begin with a walk down a spiral steel staircase that was built in 1908.

Bird-watchers spend a lot of time in the glen looking for American kestrels, black-capped chickadees, Bonaparte’s gulls, canvasback ducks, common goldeneyes, eastern phoebes, glaucous gulls, great black-backed gulls, greater scaups, herring gulls, house finches (probably the descendants of those released in New York City in the 1940s), lesser blackbacked gulls, lesser scaups, little gulls, northern orioles, oldsquaw ducks, purple finches, red-tailed hawks, ring-billed gulls, savannah sparrows, yellow-bellied sapsuckers and yellow warblers. This trail guide includes Cliffside Path, Eddy Path, Woodland Path, Terrace Path, Trillium Path, Cobblestone Path, and River Path."

Recent Trail Reviews

8/1/2009
3

Don't miss this hike if you're visiting Niagara Falls. Although the trails are well travelled, compared with the Falls themselves it's a great getaway from the crowds. This hike features views of both river rapids and amazing rock formations. The trail guide is quite sketchy and lacks a map; we invested in the $2 hiking map at the shop and found it worth the money to help navigate the sometimes-confusing maze of interlocking trails. The suggested route in the guide was a good one, though. A few notes: the trail that looks brown on the map is blazed a bright red. And the cutoff trail that looks aqua on the map is blazed what appeared to be the same blue as the River trail. We nearly went astray at the intersection of these trails, but to stay on the River Trail, just stay by the river! We also had trouble finding the Giant Pothole formation. If you're following the route in the trail guide and looking for the Giant Pothole, keep watch a few hundred feet after passing the Hanging Rock. You'll see a blaze on a tree to the left and blazes on a wide crack in the rocks to the right (the trail actually makes a confusing circle here, as shown on the map). Pass through the crack and immediately look UP and to your left to spot the pothole. Have fun! We'll definitely do this hike again!



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