The Hawk

Shelburne, Nova Scotia

0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars0 out of 5 stars
0 Reviews
0 out of 5
If you are a birdwatcher, then The Hawk is one place you must visit. Considered possibly the finest birding site accessible by foot in Atlantic Canada, The Hawk enjoys an unparalleled diversity of bird species at any time of the year. As the southernmost tip of the province, and on one of the great migratory bird routes of North America, Cape Sable Island is a stopping place for many regulars and an endlessly surprising variety of rare and stray species blown in off the stormy Atlantic Ocean. Migrating shorebirds gather here in great flocks in the spring and fall. Snowy owls often choose its windswept grasses as an ideal home for the winter. The Hawk is also an example of the casual and unintended destructiveness of human activity. The dunes here, still impressive and dramatic, once rose almost 40m/yd above the high water – the highest dunes in Canada. By 1829, sheep released by the settlers to graze on the grasses that covered the dunes, and protected them from erosion from the vicious winds, had reduced the dunes to half their former height.
Hiking Trails of Nova Scotia

DESCRIPTION FROM:

Hiking Trails of Nova Scotia

by Michael Haynes (Goose Lane Editions)

If you are a birdwatcher, then The Hawk is one place you must visit. Considered possibly the finest birding site accessible by foot in Atlantic Canada, The Hawk enjoys an unparalleled diversity of bird species at any time of the year. As the southernmost tip of the province, and on one of the great migratory bird routes of North America, Cape Sable Island is a stopping place for many regulars and an endlessly surprising variety of rare and stray species blown in off the stormy Atlantic Ocean. Migrating shorebirds gather here in great flocks in the spring and fall.

Snowy owls often choose its windswept grasses as an ideal home for the winter. The Hawk is also an example of the casual and unintended destructiveness of human activity. The dunes here, still impressive and dramatic, once rose almost 40m/yd above the high water – the highest dunes in Canada. By 1829, sheep released by the settlers to graze on the grasses that covered the dunes, and protected them from erosion from the vicious winds, had reduced the dunes to half their former height.

©  Michael Haynes/Goose Lane Editions. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Shelburne
Distance: 5.25
Trail Type: Loop/Lollipop
Skill Level: Easy to Moderate
Duration: 2 to 3 hours
Season: Best spring through fall
Local Maps: Sable Island 20 P/5
Driving Directions: Directions to The Hawk

Recent Trail Reviews

There are no reviews for this trail.

Trail Photos

Activity Feed

May 2018