Mapleton Park Trails

Moncton, New Brunswick

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Mapleton Park was opened to take some of the pressure off Centennial Park, and to protect the flood plain of the west branch of Halls Creek, which winds through the park. It is another good example of Acadian forest habitat. The park is home to the oldest beech tree in the city of Moncton. Over 200 species of plants grow here. In spring, the nodding trillium, starflower, Clintonia, pink lady’s slipper, wild lily of the valley, rose twisted stalk, and many other woodland flowers flourish under the trees. In the summer, orange jewelweed adds a cheerful touch to the stream banks, and deep pink sheep laurel and purple vetch dot the fields. In the fall, the woods seem to be full of red squirrels gathering spruce cones and other food for the long winter ahead.

Mapleton Park Trails Professional Review and Guide

"Mapleton Park was opened to take some of the pressure off Centennial Park, and to protect the flood plain of the west branch of Halls Creek, which winds through the park. It is another good example of Acadian forest habitat. The park is home to the oldest beech tree in the city of Moncton.

Over 200 species of plants grow here. In spring, the nodding trillium, starflower, Clintonia, pink lady’s slipper, wild lily of the valley, rose twisted stalk, and many other woodland flowers flourish under the trees. In the summer, orange jewelweed adds a cheerful touch to the stream banks, and deep pink sheep laurel and purple vetch dot the fields. In the fall, the woods seem to be full of red squirrels gathering spruce cones and other food for the long winter ahead."

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Moncton
Distance: 4.25
Trail Type: Several options
Duration: 1.75 hours
Season: Best spring through fall
Additional Use: Skiing
Accessibility: Stroller/Wheelchair Accessible
Driving Directions: Directions to Mapleton Park Trails

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May 2018