Russet Lake

Whistler, British Columbia

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1 Review
4 out of 5
Russet Lake is located in alpine country within Garibaldi Provincial Park. It is above Singing Pass, which is at the east end of the ridge running back from Whistler Mountain. The ridge is known as the Musical Bumps (Oboe, Flute and Piccolo summits) and the drainage from the pass is Melody Creek. You’ll also cross Harmony Creek on the way. At the pass you view a seemingly endless meadow with a lush growth of the flowering plants common in British Columbia’s mountain meadows—those plants described on the information board at Singing Pass as “tough... but delicate,” with a plea to respect their fragility and stay on the trail. From the pass to the lake you are in the sublimity of the alpine, with the glaciated summits of the Spearhead and Fitzsimmons Ranges ahead and above you, and with the glistening snowfields of Castle Towers and its neighbours across the valley to the south. At the northwest end of the lake is a British Columbia Mountaineering Club cabin, open to the public. Camping is also allowed here.
103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia

DESCRIPTION FROM:

103 Hikes in Southwestern British Columbia

by Jack Bryceland and Mary & David Macaree (Greystone Books)

Russet Lake is located in alpine country within Garibaldi Provincial Park. It is above Singing Pass, which is at the east end of the ridge running back from Whistler Mountain. The ridge is known as the Musical Bumps (Oboe, Flute and Piccolo summits) and the drainage from the pass is Melody Creek. You’ll also cross Harmony Creek on the way. At the pass you view a seemingly endless meadow with a lush growth of the flowering plants common in British Columbia’s mountain meadows—those plants described on the information board at Singing Pass as “tough... but delicate,” with a plea to respect their fragility and stay on the trail.

From the pass to the lake you are in the sublimity of the alpine, with the glaciated summits of the Spearhead and Fitzsimmons Ranges ahead and above you, and with the glistening snowfields of Castle Towers and its neighbours across the valley to the south. At the northwest end of the lake is a British Columbia Mountaineering Club cabin, open to the public. Camping is also allowed here.

©  Jack Bryceland and Mary & David Macaree/Greystone Books. All Rights Reserved.

Activity Type: Hiking
Nearby City: Whistler
Distance: 17
Elevation Gain: 4,100 feet
Trail Type: Out-and-back
Duration: 10 hours
Season: Best July to October
Local Contacts: Garibaldi Provincial Park
Local Maps: 92J/02 Whistler
Driving Directions: Directions to Russet Lake

Recent Trail Reviews

8/12/2006
0

Russett Lake is a must do hike if you are in the Whistler area. Be mindful that it is a popular backpacking destination, but if you hit it on a weekday the lake and hut will most likely be exclusively yours. If the weather is good and you have an extra day, try scrambling Mt. Fissle. Mt. Fissle shoots up from the lake. I started at the Singing Pass trailhead, which is hard to find, you must first hike up the left side of the mountain bike park. The trailhead begins at the big water tower. The hike to the lake is about nine miles and you gain about 4,200 vertical feet in the process. You don’t get any good views until Singing Pass (for spectacular views return via Musical Bumps). It isn’t tough, but is a steady climb; by mile nine it gets to you. You can use the hut for storing food and cooking. I would not recommend sleeping in it, unless you like mice running around your head (not just one or two, but dozens). The weather turned on me and I slept in it for one night as to dry out my tent so I could make an early exit the next morning. I eventually moved to the table to sleep that way they couldn’t get near me. There are nails for storing your food out of the reach of the aggressive mice. My return route went over what are called the Musical Bumps (approx 8.5 miles from lake to Roundhouse Lodge). I suggest going this way on the way back that way you can ride the gondola down to Whistler Village for free (if you begin going this way, you will be charged for riding the gondola up). This route gives you some incredible views of the peaks and glaciers surrounding Whistler/Blackcomb. Your trip will travel exclusively through alpine and sub alpine terrain. Enjoy the trip, you can do it in one long day, but I would recommend making it at least an overnight trip or even a two night adventure so you can take in the scenery and relax. Each route took me about 4.5 hours to complete with a full pack.



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May 2018